Total Solar Eclipse 2017: You should get in the way!
A total Solar Eclipse expected this August 21 will see the moon cover the Sun entirely. A few places on earth will be able to see an entire ‘black’ Sun, as the moon will be exactly in the path of the Sun and the Earth.
A total Solar Eclipse expected this August 21 will see the moon cover the Sun entirely. A few places on earth will be able to see an entire ‘black’ Sun, as the moon will be exactly in the path of the Sun and the Earth.
On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun. Anyone within the path of totality can see one of nature’s most awe inspiring sights — a total solar eclipse. This path, where the moon will completely cover the sun and the sun's tenuous atmosphere — the corona — can be seen, will stretch from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina.
On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun. Anyone within the path of totality can see one of nature’s most awe inspiring sights — a total solar eclipse. This path, where the moon will completely cover the sun and the sun's tenuous atmosphere — the corona — can be seen, will stretch from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina.
Diagram showing the Earth-sun-moon geometry of a total solar eclipse. Not to scale: If drawn to scale, the Moon would be 30 Earth diameters away. The sun would be 400 times that distance.
Diagram showing the Earth-sun-moon geometry of a total solar eclipse. Not to scale: If drawn to scale, the Moon would be 30 Earth diameters away. The sun would be 400 times that distance.
Who Can See It? Lots of people! Everyone in the contiguous United States, in fact, everyone in North America plus parts of South America, Africa, and Europe will see at least a partial solar eclipse, while the thin path of totality will pass through portions of 14 states.
Who Can See It? Lots of people! Everyone in the contiguous United States, in fact, everyone in North America plus parts of South America, Africa, and Europe will see at least a partial solar eclipse, while the thin path of totality will pass through portions of 14 states.
Total solar eclipse over Oregon
Total solar eclipse over Oregon
Total solar eclipse over Idaho
Total solar eclipse over Idaho
Total solar eclipse over Wyoming
Total solar eclipse over Wyoming
Total solar eclipse over Nebraska and Kansas
Total solar eclipse over Nebraska and Kansas
Total solar eclipse over Kentucky, Tennesse, and North Carolina
Total solar eclipse over Kentucky, Tennesse, and North Carolina
Total solar eclipse over Kentucky, Tennesse, and North Carolina
Total solar eclipse over Kentucky, Tennesse, and North Carolina
Total solar eclipse over Kentucky, Tennesse, and North Carolina
Total solar eclipse over Kentucky, Tennesse, and North Carolina
Total solar eclipse over South Carolina and Georgia
Total solar eclipse over South Carolina and Georgia
Total solar eclipse over South Carolina and Georgia
Total solar eclipse over South Carolina and Georgia
Times for partial and total phases of the eclipse vary depending on your location. This interactive eclipse map (link is external) will show you times for the partial and total eclipse anywhere in the world.
Times for partial and total phases of the eclipse vary depending on your location. This interactive eclipse map (link is external) will show you times for the partial and total eclipse anywhere in the world.
How Can You See It?
You never want to look directly at the sun without appropriate protection except during totality.  That could severely hurt your eyes.  However, there are many ways to safely view an eclipse of the sun including direct viewing – which requires some type of filtering device and indirect viewing where you project an image of the sun onto a screen. Both methods should produce clear images of the partial phase of an eclipse.
How Can You See It? You never want to look directly at the sun without appropriate protection except during totality. That could severely hurt your eyes. However, there are many ways to safely view an eclipse of the sun including direct viewing – which requires some type of filtering device and indirect viewing where you project an image of the sun onto a screen. Both methods should produce clear images of the partial phase of an eclipse.
This list describes when to wear your glasses and when you can safely look at the eclipse, only during totality!
This list describes when to wear your glasses and when you can safely look at the eclipse, only during totality!
Using a projection method to view the sun is also another way to watch the Solar Eclipse in full action.
Using a projection method to view the sun is also another way to watch the Solar Eclipse in full action.
People around the world have been preparing for the specticular event since months. In this June 29, 2017 file photo, David Chrismon, left, a member of Guilford Technical Community College's student astronomy club, the Stellar Society, watches as Steve Desch, an astronomy instructor, sets up a telescope in Jamestown, N.C., that the group will use on their trip to Newberry, S.C. to observe a solar eclipse on Aug. 21. (Laura Greene/The High Point Enterprise via AP)
People around the world have been preparing for the specticular event since months. In this June 29, 2017 file photo, David Chrismon, left, a member of Guilford Technical Community College's student astronomy club, the Stellar Society, watches as Steve Desch, an astronomy instructor, sets up a telescope in Jamestown, N.C., that the group will use on their trip to Newberry, S.C. to observe a solar eclipse on Aug. 21. (Laura Greene/The High Point Enterprise via AP)
Cardboard frames for solar eclipse glasses are stacked in the American Paper Optics factory in Bartlett, Tenn., on Wednesday, June 21, 2017. The company is one of many businesses _ hotels, campgrounds and stores _ taking advantage of the total solar eclipse _ when the moon passes between Earth and the sun. The moon's shadow will fall in a diagonal ribbon across the U.S., from Oregon to South Carolina. (AP Photo/Adrian Sainz)
Cardboard frames for solar eclipse glasses are stacked in the American Paper Optics factory in Bartlett, Tenn., on Wednesday, June 21, 2017. The company is one of many businesses _ hotels, campgrounds and stores _ taking advantage of the total solar eclipse _ when the moon passes between Earth and the sun. The moon's shadow will fall in a diagonal ribbon across the U.S., from Oregon to South Carolina. (AP Photo/Adrian Sainz)
American Paper Optics President and CEO John Jerit looks at a display of solar eclipse glasses in Bartlett, Tenn., on Wednesday, June 21, 2017. Jerit said the company began preparing about two years ago for the August 2017 event. (AP Photo/Adrian Sainz)
American Paper Optics President and CEO John Jerit looks at a display of solar eclipse glasses in Bartlett, Tenn., on Wednesday, June 21, 2017. Jerit said the company began preparing about two years ago for the August 2017 event. (AP Photo/Adrian Sainz)
Employees prepare solar eclipse glasses for shipping at the American Paper Optics factory in Bartlett, Tenn., on Wednesday, June 21, 2017. Staring at the sun during an eclipse _ or anytime _ can cause eye damage. The only safe way is to protect your eyes with special filters in glasses or other devices.  (AP Photo/Adrian Sainz)
Employees prepare solar eclipse glasses for shipping at the American Paper Optics factory in Bartlett, Tenn., on Wednesday, June 21, 2017. Staring at the sun during an eclipse _ or anytime _ can cause eye damage. The only safe way is to protect your eyes with special filters in glasses or other devices. (AP Photo/Adrian Sainz)
A display holds solar eclipse glasses  in the American Paper Optics factory in Bartlett, Tenn., on Wednesday, June 21, 2017. Staring at the sun during an eclipse _ or anytime _ can cause eye damage. The only safe way is to protect your eyes with special filters in glasses or other devices. (AP Photo/Adrian Sainz)
A display holds solar eclipse glasses in the American Paper Optics factory in Bartlett, Tenn., on Wednesday, June 21, 2017. Staring at the sun during an eclipse _ or anytime _ can cause eye damage. The only safe way is to protect your eyes with special filters in glasses or other devices. (AP Photo/Adrian Sainz)
FILE - In this June 26, 2017 file photo, Laurel Krokstrom holds a model of the Earth, while Jamalee Clark, right, uses a flashlight to simulate the sun while Laura Peticolas, center, holds the moon and explains how a total solar eclipse occurs, in Gering, Neb. (Irene North/The Star-Herald via AP)
FILE - In this June 26, 2017 file photo, Laurel Krokstrom holds a model of the Earth, while Jamalee Clark, right, uses a flashlight to simulate the sun while Laura Peticolas, center, holds the moon and explains how a total solar eclipse occurs, in Gering, Neb. (Irene North/The Star-Herald via AP)