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Food texture affects how much you eat, says study

PTI
Published Apr 17, 2014, 1:46 am IST
Updated Apr 7, 2019, 8:28 pm IST
People perceive food that is either hard or has a rough texture to have fewer calories
Photo courtesy: www.visualphotos.com
 Photo courtesy: www.visualphotos.com

Washington: People perceive food that is either hard or has a rough texture to have fewer calories, researchers, including Indian-origin scientists, have found. 

"We studied the link between how a food feels in your mouth and the amount we eat, the types of food we choose, and how many calories we think we are consuming," researchers said. 

In five laboratory studies, researchers including Dipayan Biswas, Courtney Szocs from University of South Florida and Aradhna Krishna from the University of Michigan, asked participants to sample foods that were hard, soft, rough, or smooth and then measured calorie estimations for the food. 

In one study, participants were asked to watch and evaluate a series of television ads. 

While watching the ads, cups filled with bite-sized brownie bits were provided to the participants as tokens of appreciation for their time. 

Half of the participants were not asked anything about the brownies and the other half were asked a question about the calorie content of the brownies. 

Within each of these two groups, half of the participants received brownie bits that were soft and the other half received brownie bits that were hard. 

When the participants were not made to focus on the calorie content, they consumed a higher volume of brownies when they were soft. 

In contrast, when made to focus on the calorie content, the participants consumed a higher volume of brownies when they were hard. 

Brands interested in promoting the health benefits of their products can emphasise texture, as well as drawing attention to low-calorie foods. 

"Understanding how the texture of food can influence calorie perceptions, food choice, and consumption amount can help nudge consumers towards making healthier choices," the research authors concluded. 

The study was published in the Journal of Consumer Research.

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