Entertainment Movie Reviews 02 Jun 2018 Antony movie review: ...

Antony movie review: Incoherent storyline, slackly narration derails this thriller

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | ANUPAMA SUBRAMANIAN
Published Jun 2, 2018, 6:03 pm IST
Updated Jun 2, 2018, 6:10 pm IST
Though Antony had all the potential of a hard-hitting suspense thriller, it falters due to its incoherent storyline and slackly narration.
Poster of 'Antony.'
 Poster of 'Antony.'
Rating:

Director: Kutty Kumar

Cast: Nishanth, Lal, Vaishali

 

Antony was touted to be India’s first claustrophobic science thriller although we have seen a similar attempt in Tamil few years back with Jai Akash playing an engineer who is trapped inside a wooden box and does not know who has put him in such a situation. And here the protagonist gets trapped inside a car that’s buried under the ground. 

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The movie begins at the picturesque locale of Kodiakkanal where Antony (Nishanth), a straightforward cop, finds himself trapped in a car when he wakes up and is clueless as to how he landed up there. He tries to recollect as to who among his foes could have put him in this life-threatening situation. Meanwhile, his girlfriend Maha (Vaishali) is waiting for him at the registrar office to tie the knot with him with the support of his dad George (Lal), a former cop. George, being a doting father, sets on a mission to find out his missing son along with two of his friends and Maha.

Also read: Kaalakkoothu movie review: Mismatch of worthy performers against clichéd script

Though Antony had all the potential of a hard-hitting suspense thriller, it falters due to its incoherent storyline and slackly narration. While Antony’s innovative attempts to hold on to his life with the available stuff in the car are appreciable, the same cannot be said of his dad played by M’town veteran Lal who does nothing except going up and down in the hilly roads in his car and vent out his frustration by chain-smoking.  Teenage composer Sivathmika’s BGM goes well with the mood of the film barring a few scenes where it doesn’t gel. Balaji’s cinematography is noteworthy, capturing the night effect of the hilly terrain as well as shots inside the trapped car.

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