Reversing diabetes

Deccan Chronicle.

Lifestyle, Health and Wellbeing

Although there’s no cure for Type 2 diabetes, experts say it’s possible to reverse it through diet changes and weight loss

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the commonest form of diabetes. (DC File)

Samantha was diagnosed with diabetes in 2013, but she overcame it with proper exercise and healthy eating. Actress Sonam Kapoor Ahuja turned diabetic at the age of 17, but with weight loss and exercise, she was able to reverse insulin resistance.  

Sonam Kapoor Ahuja. (Twitter)

Although there’s no cure for diabetes, studies show it’s possible for some people to reverse it.  

A recent study conducted by Cambridge University researchers has shown that people suffering from Type 2 diabetes have a higher risk of developing as many as 57 other health complications, including cancer and neurological and kidney ailments. It is often linked to obesity or inactivity, and those with a family history of the disease are more prone to it. The good news is that it can be reversed through rapid weight loss. The American Diabetic Association also recommends at least 30 minutes of physical activity -- be it a daily walk, jogging, or any sport you enjoy

Prevalence of diabetes is increasing globally. India has recorded the maximum increase during the last few years. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the commonest form of diabetes.

It can be a life-long, chronic disease in which the body either does not produce enough insulin or the cells don’t respond to insulin correctly (insulin resistance). Because of these problems, there isn’t enough insulin to move the glucose from the blood into the cells. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, the body’s cells can’t function properly.

Type 2 diabetes is more likely to occur in people who are over the age of 40, overweight, or have a family history of diabetes. Recently, an increased occurrence of Type 2 diabetes in youngsters and teenagers has been noticed, due to poor lifestyle and dietary patterns causing obesity. Certain ethnic and racial groups also have higher risk of Type 2 diabetes.  According to recent research, Type 2 diabetes cannot be cured, but glucose levels can return to non-diabetes range (complete remission) or pre-diabetes glucose level (partial remission). People with Type 2 diabetes achieve remission primarily by losing significant amounts of weight.  

Too much weight gain can again trigger the recurrence of high blood sugar. Hence weight loss once achieved needs to be maintained by consistent effort, best done by good lifestyle management.

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