World Europe 31 Dec 2016 In Paris, there will ...

In Paris, there will be a firework display again, after muted 2015 celebrations

PTI
Published Dec 31, 2016, 8:14 pm IST
Updated Dec 31, 2016, 8:28 pm IST
Nearly 100,000 police, gendarmes and soldiers will be deployed across France against the jihadist threat.
With a day to go before New Year's Eve final countdown, France's Interior and Defense Ministers reassured tourists in the capital and insisted security forces were in place to protect them. (Photo: AP)
 With a day to go before New Year's Eve final countdown, France's Interior and Defense Ministers reassured tourists in the capital and insisted security forces were in place to protect them. (Photo: AP)

Paris: In Paris, there will be a firework display again, after muted 2015 celebrations following the massacre of 130 people. Nearly 100,000 police, gendarmes and soldiers will be deployed across France against the jihadist threat.

With more than a million people expected to turn out to watch the ball drop in Times Square, New York is deploying 165 "blocker" trucks and some 7,000 police.

 

Rome has deployed armoured vehicles and greater numbers of security forces around the Coliseum and St Peter's Square, where Pope Francis will celebrate a "Te Deum" hymn of thanksgiving.

Moscow police will deploy more than 5,000 officers backed by thousands more from the new national guard and volunteer militia to maintain order.

Thousands traditionally gather in Red Square, but for the second year in a row, the area will be open solely to 6,000 invitees.

London will have 3,000 officers on patrol with crowds flocking to line the banks of the Thames to watch the fireworks.

 

Up to two million people are expected to party at Rio's Copacabana beach. But with Brazil mired in its worst recession in a century, the fireworks have been cut to just 12 minutes.

Normally boisterous Bangkok will see in the new year on a more sombre note as the nation grieves for King Bhumibol Adulyadej, who died in October.

And, at the stroke of midnight, the celebrations will last one second longer, a leap second decreed by the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service to allow astronomical time to catch up with atomic clocks that have called the hour since 1967.

 

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