Campaign to save Reef from starfish

AFP
Published Jan 23, 2018, 1:27 am IST
Updated Jan 23, 2018, 1:27 am IST
Naturally-occurring predators multiply due to pollution.
42 per cent of the damage has been attributed to pest.
 42 per cent of the damage has been attributed to pest.

Sydney: A multimillion-dollar campaign to stop the predatory crown-of-thorns starfish devouring the Great Barrier Reef was announced by the Australian government on Monday in a push to preserve the World Heritage-listed ecosystem.

The coral-eating starfish are naturally occurring but have proliferated due to pollution and agricultural run-off at the struggling reef. Their impact has been profound — a major study of the 2,300-km (1,400-mile) long reef’s health in 2012 showed coral cover has halved over the past 27 years, with 42 per cent of the damage attributed to the pest.

 

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said Australian dollar 60 million ($58 million) would go into the new drive, with just over half to be spent on incentives for farmers to prevent agricultural pollutants from running into the reef. Funds will also go towards increasing the number of patrol vessels and divers targeting the starfish, he said.

“It is a vibrant, resilient ecosystem and one of the best-managed coral reef ecosystems in the world,” Turnbull said. “While it is facing increasing threats, we intend to remain leaders in reef management,” he said, adding the fund would support the development of new technology to help protect the reef. The reef is also reeling from significant coral bleaching due to warming sea temperatures linked to climate change.





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