107th Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra2237241231929448 Tamil Nadu118594711161636 Delhi102831742173165 Gujarat37636267441978 Uttar Pradesh2996819627313 Telangana2761216287313 Karnataka2681511100417 West Bengal2383715790804 Rajasthan2140416575472 Andhra Pradesh211979745252 Haryana1799913645279 Madhya Pradesh1562711768622 Bihar12525933898 Assam12523833016 Odisha10097670354 Jammu and Kashmir89315399143 Punjab67494554175 Kerala5895345228 Chhatisgarh3415272814 Uttarakhand3230262143 Jharkhand3018210422 Goa190311568 Tripura171612481 Manipur14307710 Himachal Pradesh107876410 Puducherry104351714 Nagaland6443030 Chandigarh4924017 Arunachal Pradesh270922 Mizoram1971390 Sikkim125650 Meghalaya94432
World Asia 28 May 2020 China's parliam ...

China's parliament approves Hong Kong national security bill

AFP
Published May 28, 2020, 1:27 pm IST
Updated May 28, 2020, 1:27 pm IST
According to a draft released last week, the law would allow Chinese mainland security agencies to operate openly in Hong Kong
Chinese President Xi Jinping votes on a proposal to draft a security law on Hong Kong during the closing session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on May 28, 2020. (AFP)
 Chinese President Xi Jinping votes on a proposal to draft a security law on Hong Kong during the closing session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on May 28, 2020. (AFP)

Beijing: China's rubber-stamp parliament endorsed plans Thursday to impose a national security law on Hong Kong that critics say will destroy the city's autonomy.

Over 2,800 members of the National People's Congress (NPC) voted overwhelmingly in favour of the proposal to draft the law, which would punish secession, subversion of state power, terrorism and acts that endanger national security.

 

The announcement of the result was met with sustained and loud applause by delegates.

Only one person opposed the proposal, while six abstained.

The law would be directly imposed by mainland authorities, effectively bypassing Hong Kong's government.

According to a draft of the proposal released last week, the law would allow mainland security agencies to operate openly in Hong Kong.

The NPC Standing Committee -- which is likely to meet next in June -- will now be tasked with formulating the legislation, which Beijing has said must be done "at an early date".

 

The plans have prompted condemnation from foreign governments, investors and Hong Kong's pro-democracy movement, who say China is eradicating the freedoms it promised the city under its 1997 handover agreement with Britain.

The United States Wednesday revoked its special status for Hong Kong, alleging the city was no longer autonomous from Beijing, paving the way for future sanctions and the removal of trading privileges in the financial hub.

 

China has made Hong Kong's national security law a top priority in this year's annual parliamentary sessions after huge pro-democracy protests rocked the financial hub for seven months last year.

Last week's announcement that China would impose the new security law triggered further protests in Hong Kong, although a huge police presence prevented massive gatherings.

NPC Standing Committee Vice Chairman Wang Chen said last week that Hong Kong's delays in implementing its own security law had forced the Chinese leadership to take action.

 

"More than 20 years after Hong Kong's return, however, relevant laws are yet to materialise due to the sabotage and obstruction by those trying to sow trouble in Hong Kong and China at large, as well as external hostile forces," Wang said.

China has not only refused to address protesters' concerns, but also routinely attacked them as "anti-China chaotic forces" secretly backed by Western powers, bent on destroying the city and seeking full independence from the mainland.

 

Mainland authorities frequently use the national security law to detain activists, journalists and lawyers under the pretext of "state subversion" -- in some cases for several years without trial or access to lawyers.

Several critical details about the law have yet to be clarified -- including how it will define crimes as well as "foreign interference", whether offenders would be tried in Hong Kong or China, whether Hong Kong's foreign judges will be allowed to decide national security cases, and whether the law would be retroactive.

 

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT