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World Asia 17 Jun 2019 Everything you need ...

Everything you need to know about the on-going Hong Kong protests

DECCAN CHRONICLE.
Published Jun 17, 2019, 2:23 pm IST
Updated Jun 17, 2019, 2:23 pm IST
These protests are the largest in Hong Kong since the Umbrella Movement in 2014.
Various protests have been launched in Hong Kong by the general public and legal communities. (Photo: AP)
 Various protests have been launched in Hong Kong by the general public and legal communities. (Photo: AP)

Hong Kong: The recent Hong Kong anti-extradition bill protests are a series of demonstrations in Hong Kong and other cities, demanding the withdrawal of the Fugitive Offenders and Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters Legislation (Amendment) Bill 2019 which was proposed by the Government of Hong Kong.

These protests are the largest in Hong Kong since the Umbrella Movement in 2014.

 

Various protests have been launched in Hong Kong by the general public and legal communities.

The second reading was originally scheduled on 12 June but was not held due to protests and a scheduled meeting on the next day, 13 June, was also postponed.

On 15 June 2019, the bill was indefinitely delayed by Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam.

The organizers of the 16 June 2019 protest claim nearly two million people joined the protest. If the claims are accurate, it would be the largest protest in Hong Kong's history.

Why this extradition bill?

The latest proposal came after a 19-year-old Hong Kong man allegedly murdered his pregnant girlfriend in Taiwan. The man fled Taiwan and returned to Hong Kong last year.

The Taiwan officials asked Hong Kong authorities to extradite the man but the Hong Kong officials said that they cannot comply because of a lack of extradition agreement with Taiwan.

What is Hong Kong protest for?

Many believe that the bill would cause the city to open up to mainland Chinese law and that people from Hong Kong could become subject to a different legal system.

Despite the widespread demonstrations, the government insists on the bill's passage, stating that the bill is urgent and that the legal "loophole" should be fixed.

Photos | Anti-extradition bill protests in Hong Kong

Under this bill, it will allow for extradition requests from authorities in mainland China, Taiwan and Macau for suspects accused of criminal wrongdoings, such as murder and rape.

The requests will then be decided on a case-by-case basis.

There has been a lot of public opposition, and critics say people would be subjected to arbitrary detention, unfair trial and torture under China's judicial system.

Who all are opposing the bill?

The opposition against the law ranges from all sections of society - from lawyers to schools to house wives. According to Civil Human Right’s Front, one million people took part in a march against the bill on Sunday, although police put the figure at 240,000 at its peak.

If the organisers' estimate is confirmed as correct, it would be the largest demonstration in Hong Kong since the territory was handed over to China by the British in 1997.

Earlier, about 3,000 lawyers, prosecutors, law students marched in silence and called on the government to shelve the proposal.

Hundreds of petitions against the law were started by university and secondary school alumni, overseas students and church groups have also appeared online.

The petition from St. Francis' Canossian College - Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam's alma mater - has been signed by more than 1,300.

Housewives have also voiced their concern and it has collected over 6,000 signatures.

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Location: Hong Kong, Hongkong


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