World America 22 Mar 2016 New dimension of pri ...

New dimension of prime numbers to fore

AGENCIES
Published Mar 22, 2016, 1:23 am IST
Updated Mar 22, 2016, 7:21 am IST
The study said that consecutive prime numbers try hard not to be similar.
Researchers studying prime numbers at Stanford University have stumbled upon a new phenomenon.
 Researchers studying prime numbers at Stanford University have stumbled upon a new phenomenon.

Washington: Do you know while making any online transactions with credit or debit card prime numbers are involved in completing your transaction.

Prime numbers have both fascinated and boggled mathematicians for millennia. But a new study contends that one aspect of prime numbers’ core usefulness—the ability to appear random—may not be what we suspected it to be.

 

According to a study carried out by researchers at Stanford University which got published in arXiv said that consecutive prime numbers try hard not to be similar. That is, they may not be as random as once thought.

Despite having a simple definition, a whole number that cannot be exactly divided by any other number than 1 or itself, prime numbers display many levels of complexity, Quartz reported.

They don’t, for instance, show a discernible pattern, and thus appear random. It is this uniqueness that is used to encrypt important information swapped over the open internet.

For instance, every time you make an online purchase with a credit card, prime numbers spring into action to complete that transaction for you securely.

Researchers studying prime numbers at Stanford University have stumbled upon a new phenomenon. In their study, published on arXiv, they show that consecutive prime numbers try hard not to be similar. That is, they may not be as random as once thought.

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