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World America 16 Apr 2017 US: Black Muslims ai ...

US: Black Muslims aim for unity in challenging time for Islam

AP
Published Apr 16, 2017, 1:25 pm IST
Updated Apr 16, 2017, 1:25 pm IST
They feel discrimination for being black or Muslim and for being black and Muslim among a population of immigrant Muslims in Dearborn.
Fatimah Farooq is shown, Tuesday, March 14, 2017 in Ann Arbor, Mich. Farooq counsels refugees who have been victims of trauma, torture or sex trafficking. In between, she is trying to navigate being black, Muslim and a daughter of immigrants. (Photo: AP)
 Fatimah Farooq is shown, Tuesday, March 14, 2017 in Ann Arbor, Mich. Farooq counsels refugees who have been victims of trauma, torture or sex trafficking. In between, she is trying to navigate being black, Muslim and a daughter of immigrants. (Photo: AP)

Dearborn (Michigan): In her job as a refugee case manager, Fatimah Farooq would come to work in a hijab and speak with her clients in Arabic. Nonetheless, she found herself being asked whether she was Muslim.

It’s not easy, Farooq says, navigating her dual identities as black and Muslim.

 

“I’m constantly trying to prove that I belong,” said Farooq, who now works in public health. “It’s really hard not to be an outsider in a community especially today, in the current times.”

Many Muslims are reeling from a US presidential administration that’s cracked down on immigrants, including the introduction of a travel ban that suspends new visas for people from six Muslim-majority countries and is now tied up in court.

But black American-born Muslims say they have been pushed to the edges of the conversations, even by those who share the same religion.

They say they often feel discrimination on multiple fronts: for being black, for being Muslim and for being black and Muslim among a population of immigrant Muslims.

Farooq, whose Sudanese parents came to the US before she was born, said her own family used to attend a largely African-American mosque but then moved to a predominantly Arab one yet in both cases still felt like “outsiders.”

The identity issues have rippled into social media with Twitter’s #BeingBlackAndMuslim and @BlkMuslimWisdom formed in recent weeks to amplify stories of black Muslims, whether it’s to praise Mahershala Ali, who is black and became the first Muslim actor to win an Oscar, or to express concern over the lack of black speakers at a recent Islamic conference.

Tensions are also being aired at community town halls, with panelists questioning why there hasn’t been more involvement from Arab and South Asian Muslims in Black Lives Matter events.

In response, activists say they’re seizing the opportunity to unite Muslims of all backgrounds.

Kashif Syed, who lives in the Washington, DC area, grew up in a family of South Asian Muslim immigrants around Detroit that was insulated from black Muslims. Now that he’s part of a young professional Muslim community, he’s trying to honor the experiences of others.

“We’re seeing increasingly visible threats to Muslims across the country now, it’s an important reminder of what black communities have endured for generations in this country,” said Syed, who volunteers at Townhall Dialogue, a nonprofit fostering discussions about US Muslim identity.

“I can’t really think of a better time for non-black Muslims to start examining how we got here, and what lessons we can learn from the hard-won victories of black communities from the civil rights movement.”

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