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World America 10 Jul 2019 US Bill on Green Car ...

US Bill on Green Card might benefit Indians

PTI
Published Jul 10, 2019, 2:19 am IST
Updated Jul 10, 2019, 2:19 am IST
7 per cent country cap for job-based visas to be eliminated.
Some of the recent studies have said the waiting period for Indian IT professionals on H-1B visas is more than 70 years.
 Some of the recent studies have said the waiting period for Indian IT professionals on H-1B visas is more than 70 years.

Washington: US lawmakers will vote on Tuesday on lifting the seven per cent country-cap on issuing the Green Card, a move which may benefit thousands of highly-skilled Indian IT professionals waiting in the queue for decades.

A Green Card allows a person to live and work permanently in the US. Indian IT professionals, most of whom are highly skilled and come to the US mainly on the H-1B work visas, are the worst sufferers of the current immigration system which imposes a seven per cent per country quota on allotment of the coveted Green Cards or permanent legal residency.

 

Being supported by more than 310 lawmakers from both the Republican and the Democratic Party, the ‘Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act’ is all set to sail through the 435-member US House of Representatives. Buoyed by the fact of 203 Democrats and 108 Republicans are co-sponsoring the bill, the proponents of the legislation are using a fast-track process which requires 290 votes to pass a bill without hearing and amendments.

Lifting the per-country cap would mainly benefit professionals from countries like India, for whom the wait for Green Card is more than a decade. Some of the recent studies have said the waiting period for Indian IT professionals on H-1B visas is more than 70 years.

No more than seven per cent of the visas may be issued to natives of any one independent country in a fiscal year, according to the US Citizenship and Immigration Serv-ices. The Library of Congress said the Act, also known as HR 1044, is the most viewed Bill in the week beginning July 7.

According to the Congressional Research Service (CRS), this Bill increases the per-country cap on family-based immigrant visas from seven per cent of the total number of such visas available that year to 15 per cent and eliminates the seven per cent cap for employment-based immigrant visas.

It also removes an offset that reduced the number of visas for individuals from China.

The Bill also establishes transition rules for employment-based visas from FY 2020-22 by reserving a percentage of EB-2 (workers with advanced degrees or exceptional ability), EB-3 (skilled and other workers), and EB-5 (inve-stors) visas for individuals not from the two countries with the largest number of recipients of such visas.

“Of the unreserved visas, not more than 85 per cent shall be allotted to immigrants from any single country,” the CRS said. The Bill, however, has to be passed by the Senate, wherein the Rep-ublicans enjoy a majority, before it can be signed into law by the US president. A similar Bill being supported by a bipartisan group of senators including Indian-origin Senator Kamala Harris is slated to come up for consideration soon. Both the identical Bills in the Senate and the House were introduced in February.

In the House, it was introduced by Congre-ssman Zoe Lofgren, a Democrat who represents portions of Northern California’s Silicon Valley, and Republican Ken Buck from Colorado, while in the Senate it was introduced by Harris and Mike Lee from Utah.

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