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World America 03 Oct 2016 US: Widow of 9/11 te ...

US: Widow of 9/11 terror attack victim files lawsuit against Saudi Arabia

DECCAN CHRONICLE WITH AGENCY INPUTS
Published Oct 3, 2016, 1:36 pm IST
Updated Oct 3, 2016, 2:07 pm IST
Incident comes two days after Congress passed law allowing families of victims to sue foreign governments for their role in terror attacks.
he 9/11 were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks carried out by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda on the US on September 11, 2001. (Photo: file)
 he 9/11 were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks carried out by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda on the US on September 11, 2001. (Photo: file)

Washington: A US woman whose husband lost his life during the 9/11 terror attacks has filed a lawsuit against Saudi Arabia, holding it partially responsible for the attack.

The incident comes two days after US Congress passed a law that allows families of victims to sue foreign governments for their role in terror attacks.

 

According to a report in Fox News, the complainant's husband, Navy Commander Patrick Dunn was killed after American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into Pentagon. In her complaint, the woman said that she was two months pregnant with Dunn's child when he was murdered.

The woman has claimed that Saudi government had provided terror support and required material to al-Qaeda, who have been held responsible for carrying out the terror attacks.

15 of 19 attackers, who hijacked passenger aircraft and carried out the attacks, were believed to be from Saudi.

 

On September 28, Democrats joined hands with the Republicans to hand Barack Obama the first veto override of his presidency, voting overwhelmingly to allow families of Sept. 11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia in US courts for its alleged backing of the attackers.

Both the House and Senate voted decisively to reverse Obama's decision to scuttle the legislation. Democrats in both chambers abandoned the president in large numbers despite warnings from Obama and top national security officials that flaws in the bill could put U.S. interests, troops, and intelligence personnel at risk.

 

Lawmakers said their priority wasn't Saudi Arabia, but the 9/11 victims and their families who continue to demand justice 15 years after attackers killed nearly 3,000 people in New York, the Washington, DC, area, and Pennsylvania.

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