142nd Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra54831338184318650 Tamil Nadu3145202563135278 Andhra Pradesh2641421709242378 Karnataka1964941126333511 Delhi1494601343184167 Uttar Pradesh140775887862280 West Bengal98459671202059 Telangana8647563074665 Bihar8274154139450 Gujarat71064542382652 Assam5883842326145 Rajasthan5249738235789 Odisha4592731785321 Haryana4163534781483 Madhya Pradesh3902529020996 Kerala3811424922127 Jammu and Kashmir2489717003472 Punjab2390315319586 Jharkhand185168998177 Chhatisgarh12148880996 Uttarakhand96326134125 Goa871259575 Tripura6161417641 Puducherry5382320187 Manipur3752204411 Himachal Pradesh3371218114 Nagaland30119738 Arunachal Pradesh223115923 Chandigarh1595100425 Meghalaya11154986 Sikkim9105101 Mizoram6203230
Technology Other News 02 Jul 2020 Hotels, phones cost ...

Hotels, phones cost more because Google, Facebook ads drive up prices: UK regulator

AP
Published Jul 2, 2020, 5:19 pm IST
Updated Jul 2, 2020, 5:19 pm IST
British regulators wants to rein in the duopoly’s power and bring in rules to break the anti-competitive nature of their advertising.
The UK Competition and Markets Authority said it was concerned that Google and Facebook have developed “such unassailable market positions” that rivals can’t compete on equal terms.
 The UK Competition and Markets Authority said it was concerned that Google and Facebook have developed “such unassailable market positions” that rivals can’t compete on equal terms.

London: British regulators want new rules to foster competition in digital advertising markets and rein in the industry’s dominant players, Google and Facebook.

The Competition and Markets Authority took aim at the U.S. tech giants in a report Wednesday that recommends the British government adopt a new regulatory approach to governing big digital platforms making money from online ads.

 

The authority said it was concerned that the two companies have developed “such unassailable market positions” that rivals can’t compete on equal terms, resulting in higher prices for hotels, flights, electronics, insurance and other goods and services that are heavily advertised online.

Google and Facebook accounted for about 80% of the 14 billions pounds ($17 billion) earned by the U.K.’s digital ad industry last year, the authority said. Google controls more than 90% of the U.K.’s 7.3 billion pound search advertising market while Facebook has more than half of its 5.5 billion pound display ad market.

 

After a yearlong review, regulators found that existing laws aren’t up to the job of effectively regulating the country’s digital ad markets.

“If the market power of these firms goes unchecked, people and businesses will lose out,” said, Andrea Coscelli, the CMA’s chief executive. “People will carry on handing over more of their personal data than necessary, a lack of competition could mean higher prices for goods and services bought online and we could all miss out on the benefits of the next innovative digital platform.”

 

The watchdog proposes a new “digital markets unit” with powers that would include ordering Google to share its data with rival search engines so they can improve their algorithms and limiting the search giant’s ability to secure the default search engine position on mobile phones and browsers.

Under the new rules, Facebook could also be ordered to increase its ability to operate with other social media platforms and to let consumers choose whether to receive personalised ads.

Google supports “regulation that benefits people, businesses and society,” said the company’s vice president for U.K. & Ireland, Ronan Harris. “We’ll continue to work constructively with regulatory authorities and Government on these important areas so that everyone can make the most of the web.”

 

Facebook noted it faced “significant competition” from Google, Apple, Snap, Twitter, Amazon, and newer players like TikTok, and looked forward to “engaging with U.K. government bodies on rules that protect consumers.”

Google and Facebook are already facing increased scrutiny of their ad businesses in the U.S. after two groups of state attorneys general launched separate investigations last year. One probe is examining whether Google’s ad business is engaging in monopolistic behavior while the other is looking into Facebook for alleged antitrust issues, including whether its actions increased the price of advertising.

 

Some privacy advocates looked askance at the review’s other proposals.

An idea for a “secure common digital ID” for the ad tracking industry wouldn’t be workable under the European Union’s world-leading privacy standards, said Johnny Ryan, chief policy officer at Brave, an ad-blocking web browser. Another idea to let people sell their data to digital platforms or ad brokers is dangerous, he said.

“For much the same reason why you cannot sell your kidney in this jurisdiction, you also cannot transact away your fundamental right to the protection of your data,” he said.

 

Click on Deccan Chronicle Technology and Science for the latest news and reviews. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT