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Sports Other News 30 Mar 2020 Mercedes F1 team hel ...

Mercedes F1 team helps to develop breathing aid in pandemic

AP
Published Mar 30, 2020, 2:59 pm IST
Updated Mar 30, 2020, 2:59 pm IST
The machine pushes a mix of oxygen and air into the mouth and nose at a continuous rate to increase the amount of oxygen entering the lungs
Andy Cowell, managing director of Mercedes.
 Andy Cowell, managing director of Mercedes.

London: Formula One team Mercedes has helped to develop a breathing aid that could keep coronavirus patients out of intensive care and ease some pressure on Britain's strained health service.

Mercedes worked with engineers at the University College London and clinicians at University College London Hospital to adapt and improve a device that bridges the gap between an oxygen mask and the need for full ventilation.

 

The device, known as continuous positive airway pressure, has been used extensively in hospitals in Italy and China to deliver oxygen to the lungs of coronavirus patients during the pandemic.

UCL said the adapted devices have been recommended for use in Britain and that 100 of them are being sent to its hospital for clinical trials. There is the potential for quick roll-out by Mercedes to hospitals across the country.

Tim Baker, a professor from UCL's department of mechanical engineering, said clinicians called on the "capability of Formula One'' to reduce a process "that could take years down to a matter of days,'' with the adapted device taking less than 100 hours to develop from an initial meeting.

"We have been proud to put our resources at the service of UCL,'' said Andy Cowell, managing director of Mercedes, "to deliver the CPAP project to the highest standards and in the fastest possible time frame."

CPAP machines work by pushing a mix of oxygen and air into the mouth and nose at a continuous rate, helping to increase the amount of oxygen entering the lungs. They are used routinely by Britain's National Health Service but are in short supply currently.

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