Sports Other News 19 Jun 2019 Caster Semenya says ...

Caster Semenya says officials used her as a human guinea pig

AFP
Published Jun 19, 2019, 1:47 am IST
Updated Jun 19, 2019, 1:47 am IST
The runner is locked in a bitter dispute with the IAAF over the federation’s rule requiring women with higher than normal male hormone levels.
The IAAF used me in the past as a human guinea pig to experiment with how the medication they required me to take would affect my  testosterone levels. — Caster Semenya  South African runner
 The IAAF used me in the past as a human guinea pig to experiment with how the medication they required me to take would affect my testosterone levels. — Caster Semenya South African runner

Paris: South Africa’s double Olympic 800m champion Caster Semenya on Tuesday accused world athletics’ governing body the IAAF of using her as a “human guinea pig”.

“The IAAF used me in the past as a human guinea pig to experiment with how the medication they required me to take would affect my testosterone levels,” said Semenya.

 

The runner is locked in a bitter dispute with the IAAF over the federation’s rule requiring women with higher than normal male hormone levels, a condition known as hyperandrogenism, to artificially lower their testosterone to compete in races at distances of 400m to the mile.

“Even though the hormonal drugs made me feel constantly sick, the IAAF now wants to enforce even stricter thresholds with unknown health consequences,” Semenya said in a statement.

“I will not allow the IAAF to use me and my body again. But I am concerned that other female athletes will feel compelled to let the IAAF drug them and test the effectiveness and negative health effects of different hormonal drugs. This cannot be allowed to happen,” she added.

The star athlete, who won the women’s 800 metres at the 2012 and 2016 Olympics, unknowingly underwent a gender test shortly before she won gold at the 2009 Berlin World Championships which allegedly showed she had both male and female characteristics.

She was forced to spend eight months out, the IAAF clearing her to compete again in July 2010.

Semenya had contested a decision by the Swiss-based Court of Arbitration for Sport which previously found that the rules were “discriminatory” but “necessary” to ensure fairness in women’s athletics.

The athlete’s lawyers, however, issued a statement on Tuesday welcoming the “publication by the CAS of the arbitral award setting out the CAS Panel’s reasoning and limitations in making its award”.

The CAS Panel states that “Ms Semenya is a woman. At birth, it was determined that she was female, so she was born a woman”.

“She has been raised as a woman. She has lived as a woman. She has run as a woman. She is — and always has been — recognised in law as a woman,” the Panel stated.

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