69th Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra65168280812197 Tamil Nadu2024611313157 Delhi173877846398 Gujarat1635692321007 Rajasthan83654855184 Madhya Pradesh78914444343 Uttar Pradesh77014651213 West Bengal48131775302 Andhra Pradesh3461228960 Bihar3359120915 Karnataka292299749 Telangana2499141277 Jammu and Kashmir234190828 Punjab2197194942 Odisha17239779 Haryana172194019 Kerala120957510 Assam9361044 Uttarakhand493794 Jharkhand4621914 Chhatisgarh4471021 Chandigarh2891994 Tripura2711720 Himachal Pradesh223634 Goa70420 Manipur6060 Puducherry57230 Nagaland3600 Meghalaya27121 Arunachal Pradesh310 Mizoram110 Sikkim100
Sports Football 05 Apr 2020 Premier League playe ...

Premier League players reject 30% pay cut in standoff

AP
Published Apr 5, 2020, 7:55 am IST
Updated Apr 5, 2020, 7:55 am IST
Why the govt is happy with 20 million pounds given by Premier League to the NHS when it would got 200 million pounds in taxes from players
English Premier League Trophy. AFP Photo
 English Premier League Trophy. AFP Photo

London: English Premier League players rejected a move Saturday by clubs to cut their wages by 30% during the coronavirus pandemic, escalating a bitter public row as their union claimed the government would lose out on more than 200 million pounds (around $245 million) in tax.

"This would be detrimental to our NHS (National Health Service) and other government-funded services," the Professional Footballers' Association said in a statement.

 

Taking on the Premier League as a whole, the PFA said the 20 million pounds being given to the NHS by the world's richest soccer competition was "welcome, but we believe it could be far bigger."

The union's strident stance came after further talks Saturday involving clubs and the league as Liverpool became the latest Premier League side defying political anger by using a government bailout scheme to furlough some non-playing staff.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock had told players at clubs furloughing staff to take a pay cut. Sports minister Nigel Huddleston reminded the Premier League to ensure it "helps the national effort."

Liverpool, which leads the league by 25 points, followed fellow 2019 Champions League finalist Tottenham, Bournemouth, Newcastle and Norwich in furloughing staff.

Poor move

Under a job retention scheme implemented to help businesses survive the national lockdown, staff can be put on furlough and receive 80% of their salaries from the government, up to a maximum of 2,500 pounds ($3,000) a month.

Liverpool said it would top up salaries to ensure staff still received the full amount but that still means using public funds to pay some staff. Former Liverpool defender Jamie Carragher called that a "poor" move, saying "respect and goodwill is lost" by the club.

The European champions have been owned for a decade by John Henry's Fenway Sports Group, which also features the Boston Red Sox. Liverpool made a pre-tax profit of 42 million pounds on a turnover of 533 million pounds last year and it said "complex" talks continue with players about savings on salaries.

A meeting of Premier League clubs on Friday had ended with agreement on the need to ask players to see 30% of their pay cut or deferred. But the standoff between the players' union and clubs continues.

"The players are mindful that ... the combined tax on their salaries is a significant contribution to funding essential public services -- which are especially critical at this time," the PFA said in a statement. "Taking a 30% salary deduction will cost the Exchequer (treasury) substantial sums."

If the season cannot be completed, the Premier League could owe broadcasters a reported 762 million pounds. Burnley, which has nine of its 38 games remaining, estimates a cash shortfall of 50 million pounds.

The union raised the prospect of a lengthy spell without games. Reducing pay by 30% over a year equated to 500 million pounds, the PFA said, claiming the government would lose out on more than 200 million pounds in tax.

"What effect does this loss of earning to the government mean for the NHS?" the PFA statement continued. "Was this considered in the Premier League proposal and did the health secretary, Matt Hancock, factor this in when asking players to take a salary cut?"

The PFA said players would still like "precise details of our commitment" settled, recognizing a need to help their clubs, non-playing staff, lower-league sides and the health service.

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT