Sports Cricket 23 Feb 2018 New Zealand crickete ...

New Zealand cricketer Warren Barnes in support of protective helmet for bowlers

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | BIPIN DANI
Published Feb 23, 2018, 11:09 am IST
Updated Feb 23, 2018, 11:09 am IST
In December last year, Barnes had become the first bowler using helmet while delivering the balls.
New Zealand cricketer Warren Barnes, who wears helmet while bowling, believes that the days will come when the laws would be made to protect the bowlers. (Photo: Bipin Dani)
 New Zealand cricketer Warren Barnes, who wears helmet while bowling, believes that the days will come when the laws would be made to protect the bowlers. (Photo: Bipin Dani)

Mumbai: New Zealand cricketer Warren Barnes, who wears helmet while bowling, believes that the days will come when the laws would be made to protect the bowlers.

Video: Auckland's Jeet Raval slams six off Andrew Ellis’ head in Ford Trophy match

 

He was reacting to Wednesday's incident when the ball sailed for six after hitting bowler (Andrew Ellis) head in NZ 50-over domestic match.

In December last year, Barnes had become the first bowler using helmet while delivering the balls. 

Speaking over telephone from New Zealand, Barnes says, "The face mask was originally there to stop me from getting hit, as my follow through kept my eyes off the ball more then other bowlers. But as we have seen in a few cases around the world any bowler has the chance to get hit".

"I do hope more and more bowlers look into some sort of face protection especially around the T20 game. As batters are hitting the ball harder and harder every year, it only makes sense to protect the bowlers, as in most cases they are the closest person the the batter when it gets hit".

"The game is already made some big changes around protecting batters and even umpires from getting hit in certain places, so I think it’s just a matter of time before we see laws brought in to protect bowlers”, he further added.

Gutsy player

"Andrew Ellis was struck in the head and the ball went a distance of approx 60 meters on the full after being struck for a boundary 6. Andrew was assessed immediately and reported no signs of headaches or symptoms of concussion.

He continued to bowl and also to bat later in the day without symptoms", the bowler's coach, Gary Stead said.

"Given the extremity and force of the ball strike, we will continue to monitor and have Andrew assessed by appropriate medical practitioners".

"Andrew is a tough cricketer and I think was lucky to not have sustained any significant damage. He received a small graze to the top of the head where the ball struck but nothing more that that. Whether Andrew chooses to wear a helmet in the future will be up to him", the coach concluded.  

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