112th Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra26766514900710695 Tamil Nadu147324973102099 Delhi115346932363446 Karnataka4407717391846 Gujarat43723305552070 Uttar Pradesh3972424981983 Telangana3774524840375 Andhra Pradesh3301917467408 West Bengal3283819931980 Rajasthan2557119169524 Haryana2262817090312 Madhya Pradesh1900513575673 Bihar1885313019143 Assam178081217451 Odisha14280986496 Jammu and Kashmir111736223195 Kerala8931443835 Punjab85115663213 Chhatisgarh4379327520 Jharkhand4225242836 Uttarakhand3686286750 Goa2753160718 Tripura218315382 Manipur167210200 Puducherry153182918 Himachal Pradesh130993810 Nagaland8963460 Chandigarh60044610 Arunachal Pradesh3871453 Meghalaya318462 Mizoram2381590 Sikkim211860
Science 31 Aug 2018 NASA set to launch s ...

NASA set to launch space laser to track Earth's melting ice

PTI
Published Aug 31, 2018, 12:59 pm IST
Updated Aug 31, 2018, 1:00 pm IST
NASA will measure the changes in the heights of Earth’s polar ice in unprecedented detail.
(Representational image/ Photo: Pixabay)
 (Representational image/ Photo: Pixabay)

NASA is set to launch the most advanced laser instrument of its kind into space next month, to measure the changes in the heights of Earth’s polar ice in unprecedented detail.

The Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) will measure the average annual elevation change of land ice covering Greenland and Antarctica to within the width of a pencil, capturing 60,000 measurements every second.

 

“The new observational technologies of ICESat-2 — a top recommendation of the scientific community in NASA’s first Earth science decadal survey — will advance our knowledge of how the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica contribute to sea level rise,” said Michael Freilich, from NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in the US.

ICESat-2 — which is scheduled to be launched on September 12 — represents a major technological leap in our ability to measure changes in ice height. Its Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) measures height by timing how long it takes individual light photons to travel from the spacecraft to Earth and back.

 

“ATLAS required us to develop new technologies to get the measurements needed by scientists to advance the research,” said Doug McLennan, ICESat-2 project manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. “That meant we had to engineer a satellite instrument that not only will collect incredibly precise data, but also will collect more than 250 times as many height measurements as its predecessor.”

ATLAS will fire 10,000 times each second, sending hundreds of trillions of photons to the ground in six beams of green light. The roundtrip of individual laser photons from ICESat-2 to Earth’s surface and back is timed to the billionth of a second to precisely measure elevation.

 

As it circles Earth from pole to pole, ICESat-2 will measure ice heights along the same path in the polar regions four times a year, providing seasonal and annual monitoring of ice elevation changes. Beyond the poles, ICESat-2 will measure the height of ocean and land surfaces, including forests.

ATLAS is designed to measure both the tops of trees and the ground below, which — combined with existing datasets on forest extent — will help researchers estimate the amount of carbon stored in the world’s forests. Researchers also will investigate the height data collected on ocean waves, reservoir levels, and urban areas.

 

“Because ICESat-2 will provide measurements of unprecedented precision with global coverage, it will yield not only new insight into the polar regions but also unanticipated findings across the globe,” said Thorsten Markus, an ICESat-2 project scientist at Goddard.

Click on Deccan Chronicle Technology and Science for the latest news and reviews. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter.

Click on Deccan Chronicle Technology and Science for the latest news and reviews. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT