70th Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra70013301082362 Tamil Nadu2349513170187 Delhi208348746523 Gujarat17217107801063 Rajasthan91006213199 Uttar Pradesh83615030222 Madhya Pradesh82835003358 West Bengal57722306325 Bihar3945174123 Andhra Pradesh3676237464 Karnataka3408132852 Telangana2792149188 Jammu and Kashmir260194631 Haryana2356105521 Punjab2301200044 Odisha210412459 Assam14862854 Kerala132760811 Uttarakhand9592225 Jharkhand6612965 Chhatisgarh5481211 Tripura4231730 Himachal Pradesh3401186 Chandigarh2972144 Manipur83110 Puducherry79250 Goa73500 Nagaland4300 Meghalaya28121 Arunachal Pradesh2010 Mizoram110 Sikkim100
Science 21 Sep 2016 ISRO’s multi-o ...

ISRO’s multi-orbit launch on anvil

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | PATHRI RAJASEKHAR
Published Sep 21, 2016, 7:53 am IST
Updated Sep 21, 2016, 7:53 am IST
ISRO is gearing up for its first-ever attempt to place satellites in different orbits from a single rocket launch next week.
Isro will be attempting the feat when it launches the workhorse Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle-C35 from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre, at Shar, Sriharikota at 9.12 am on September 26. (Representational image)
 Isro will be attempting the feat when it launches the workhorse Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle-C35 from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre, at Shar, Sriharikota at 9.12 am on September 26. (Representational image)

Nellore: The Indian Space Research Organisation is gearing up for its first-ever attempt to place satellites in different orbits from a single rocket launch next week. Isro will be attempting the feat when it launches the workhorse Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle-C35 from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre, at Shar, Sriharikota at 9.12 am on September 26.

The rocket will first place the 370-kg ScatSat-1, a weather satellite to watch for cyclones, in orbit 720 km above the earth. About an hour and 20 minutes later, it will inject seven smaller satellites into an orbit 670 km above the earth. Among the seven are two satellites, one of them from IIT-B, and five belonging to international customers including the US.

 

To achieve this, the fourth stage of the rocket will be ignited twice. The maximum time Isro has taken for any launch is about 20 minutes after launch. Monday’s mission will last 2 hours and 15 minutes. Satish Dhawan Space Centre director P. Kunhi Krishnan said the ScatSat-1 will be separated within 17 minutes of launch, after the fourth stage is shut off. The stage will be ignited briefly after 1 hour and 22 minutes and stopped. It will be started again about 40 minutes later, and the last satellite will be placed in orbit about 2 hours and 15 minutes after launch.

“We have demonstrated the fourth stage engine restart capability. The fourth stage was restarted once in case of PSLV C-29 and twice with respect to PSLV-C34” Mr Kunhi Krishnan told this newspaper.

Click on Deccan Chronicle Technology and Science for the latest news and reviews. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT