111th Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra25442714032510289 Tamil Nadu138470895321966 Delhi112494899683371 Gujarat41906291982046 Karnataka3884315411686 Uttar Pradesh3647623334934 Telangana3467122482356 West Bengal3001318581932 Andhra Pradesh2916815412328 Rajasthan2439218103510 Haryana2124015983301 Madhya Pradesh1763212876653 Assam168071089541 Bihar1630511953125 Odisha13737875091 Jammu and Kashmir105135979179 Kerala7874409532 Punjab78215392199 Chhatisgarh4081315319 Jharkhand3760230831 Uttarakhand3537278647 Goa2453120714 Tripura206714212 Manipur16098960 Puducherry141873918 Himachal Pradesh121391610 Nagaland8453270 Chandigarh5594178 Arunachal Pradesh3601382 Meghalaya295452 Mizoram2311500 Sikkim164810
Science 10 Feb 2017 New high-tech liquid ...

New high-tech liquid material developed

PTI
Published Feb 10, 2017, 4:18 pm IST
Updated Feb 10, 2017, 4:18 pm IST
Scientists have developed techniques to manipulate micro-organisms - which are more dynamic and flexible than solids solid materials.
The flow patterns can be changed at will, so the liquid-based materials are more dynamic and flexible than solid materials.
 The flow patterns can be changed at will, so the liquid-based materials are more dynamic and flexible than solid materials.

Scientists have developed previously unimaginable liquid materials for new technological innovations - including techniques to manipulate micro-organisms - which are more dynamic and flexible than solids solid materials.

Researchers controlled wave-generated currents to make the dynamic material that could be revolutionary, similar to those created in recent decades that have been used for invisibility cloaking, superlenses and high-efficiency antennae. Professor Michael Shats from The Australian National University (ANU) said the currents made a liquid behave like materials with regular structures such as crystals.

 

"It is an incredibly powerful new tool that will work at the surface of almost any liquid," said Shats. "By changing waves, we can change the flow patterns. This allows us to remote-control the nature of the material," said Shats.

The flow patterns can be changed at will, so the liquid-based materials are more dynamic and flexible than solid materials.

"These flow patterns are effectively two-dimensional materials at the interface between the liquid and the gas above it," said Shats.

Nicolas Francois from the ANU said each current was like a Lego brick.

 

"Now we have created the brick, people will be able to make complex structures we cannot imagine now," he said.

"If you use conducting liquids you can create an interface with designed electrical properties. Or with bio-compatible substances you can guide micro-organisms or trap them," he added.

The team observed the flow patterns in a tank of water by generating a wave pattern with two oscillators and tracking fluid particles. They also modelled the flow with computer simulations and theoretical calculations.

Click on Deccan Chronicle Technology and Science for the latest news and reviews. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT