Opinion DC Comment 17 Mar 2021 DC Edit | Competitiv ...

DC Edit | Competitive, compulsive: TN’s ‘poll freebie’ culture

DECCAN CHRONICLE.
Published Mar 17, 2021, 8:41 am IST
Updated Mar 17, 2021, 8:41 am IST
The 2021 freebie promise has been the most extensive on record with AIADMK offering a washing machine for each of about two crore families
Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (DMK) party president M. K. Stalin (top R) gestures to supporters during a rally after filing his nomination ahead of the Tamil Nadu state legislative assembly elections, in Chennai on March 15, 2021. (Arun SANKAR / AFP)
 Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (DMK) party president M. K. Stalin (top R) gestures to supporters during a rally after filing his nomination ahead of the Tamil Nadu state legislative assembly elections, in Chennai on March 15, 2021. (Arun SANKAR / AFP)

In Tamil Nadu the promise of freebies mark poll time and much of governance seems to revolve around delivering on populist measures that sustain vote banks favouring either of the Dravidian majors. The 2021 polls, slated for April 6, have triggered an even more frenetic push to promise freebies by the ruling AIADMK and the Opposition DMK, parties that have established a virtual duopoly in the 234-seat Assembly. The freebie culture has been ingrained in the psyche of the people of Tamil Nadu since the mid-1960s when the DMK came to power on top of a promise of three padis (measuring roughly 4.5 kg) of rice for a rupee, later watered down to one kg for a rupee due to financial constraints.

The 2021 freebie promise has been the most extensive on record with AIADMK offering a washing machine for each of about two crore families, besides a solar stove to go with the mixer grinder, fans and other household goods that went towards fulfilling Jayalalithaa’s concept of easing the burden of housewives and working women of chores at home and winning them over. Besides white goods, laptops for students are free as well as data. Consider the promise of Rs 1,500 a month for women, free TV cable service and affordable housing for the needy and it completes a comprehensive household package including free rations, condiments, spices and festival hampers that should ease lives. And for livelihoods there is an offer of one government job for each household, never mind if the government wage bill runs upwards of one lakh crore rupees. 

 

The DMK’s competitive offerings include Rs 1,000 for women, 75 per cent reservation in private sector jobs for locals, a year’s maternity leave and food, fuel and milk subsidies. How all the freebies add up is anyone’s guess as the state is already burdened with public debt of Rs 4.87 lakh crore as of March 31, 2020, on top of revenues earned from a highly industrialised state. There is even a promise of monetising housewives’ work in the manifesto of fringe political player Kamal Haasan’s party, which is to show how the aim for votes also somehow serves the purpose of creating a social net buttressed by health insurance and an almost free lunch that is nearly unique. There is no denying the state has been a forerunner in keeping students interested in learning in class through free education and midday meals.

 

The financial profligacy may create a burden that may never go away for seven crore people of the state. The concern for women, who constitute nearly 50 per cent of voters, does not, however, extend to political representation as the low number of seats, less than 10 per cent, allocated to them by major parties indicates. The outlier status of Tamil Nadu is further stressed as DMK and Congress promise to take state students out of the central medical entrance test NEET and emphasise their opposition to CAA as AIADMK, despite being in the NDA, has done too. Competitive freebie offers are a bizarre feature but that takes away only a little from the model welfare state Tamil Nadu has aspired to be and is in many ways a model for India.

 

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