Opinion DC Comment 07 Apr 2021 DC Edit | Clear the ...

DC Edit | Clear the air on Rafales

DECCAN CHRONICLE.
Published Apr 8, 2021, 4:28 am IST
Updated Apr 8, 2021, 4:28 am IST
The government will have to consider instituting an investigation by a credible agency or even a judicial commission
It is clear that there need be no middleman in a government-to-government deal but the latest revelation raises questions about the very claim the government had advanced. (Photo: AP)
 It is clear that there need be no middleman in a government-to-government deal but the latest revelation raises questions about the very claim the government had advanced. (Photo: AP)

The new series of reports that has come in the French media about the alleged kickbacks in the Rs 59,000 crore deal between the governments of India and France to buy 36 Rafale medium multi-role combat aircraft is disquieting. As per the report in Mediapart, a Paris-based investigative website, France’s anti-corruption agency National Financial Prosecutor’s Office, or Parquet National Financier (PNF), had in 2017 reported about the suspicious payment of half a million euros to an Indian middleman for making models of the fighter jets. The same middleman is under investigation by Indian agencies for his role in the Agusta Westland helicopter deal, which is also mired in controversy and corruption. The French agency did not pursue the case and closed the complaint filed by a well-known anti-corruption NGO “Sherpa”, the reports said.

The government of India had in 2015 cancelled the negotiations between public sector Hindustan Aeronautics Limited and Dassault Aviation, the makers of Rafale, for the purchase of 126 aircraft. The protracted discussions, started in 2012, were about to close, according to the then CEO of Dassault, when Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced a new deal to buy 36 aircraft. The government blunted criticism against the deal that it violated the defence procurement procedure by stating that it was a government-to-government deal.

 

The Supreme Court also did not find merit in the plea that there were political intervention and corruption in the deal that required to be investigated. It is clear that there need be no middleman in a government-to-government deal but the latest revelation raises questions about the very claim the government had advanced. There had already been suspicions about the government’s ignorance about Dassault’s choice of Reliance Defence as its Indian partner to meet its commitment as per the offset clause in the deal. The government will have to consider instituting an investigation by a credible agency or even a judicial commission to clear the air instead of allowing every fresh controversy to become a stick to beat it with.

 

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