Opinion DC Comment 04 Jun 2019 Don’t crowd Mt Eve ...

Don’t crowd Mt Everest

DECCAN CHRONICLE.
Published Jun 4, 2019, 7:17 am IST
Updated Jun 4, 2019, 7:17 am IST
Adventurers bunch up on certain days due to more accurate micro weather forecasting that predicts the best climbing days.
The photo taken on May 22, 2019 and released by climber Nirmal Purjas Project Possible expedition shows heavy traffic of mountain climbers lining up to stand at the summit of Mount Everest. Many teams had to line up for hours on May 22 to reach the summit, risking frostbites and altitude sickness, as a rush of climbers marked one of the busiest days on the worlds highest mountain. (Photo: AFP)
 The photo taken on May 22, 2019 and released by climber Nirmal Purjas Project Possible expedition shows heavy traffic of mountain climbers lining up to stand at the summit of Mount Everest. Many teams had to line up for hours on May 22 to reach the summit, risking frostbites and altitude sickness, as a rush of climbers marked one of the busiest days on the worlds highest mountain. (Photo: AFP)

The Himalayan ranges, standing in all their majesty with an air of indescribable mystique, have been beckoning adventurers ever since Hillary and Tenzing conquered Mount Everest on May 29, 1953. Between then and now the world has changed, more rapidly in recent times as global warming melts glaciers more and dead bodies pop out as climbers undertake ascent of the peak in Nepal. It’s a facet of modern life that there are traffic jams on the roof of the world, as more climbers scramble to take the best weather window to make the climb a bit easier.

The hazards — winds in excess of 200 kmph, threats of avalanches and altitude sickness — are exacerbated by melting ice. Adding a new deadly dimension is overenthusiastic climbers, who are there simply as they can afford the $11,000 fee and the expense of reaching the top of the world.

 

Adventurers bunch up on certain days due to more accurate micro weather forecasting that predicts the best climbing days. This is forcing Nepal to consider changing the rules.

Tragedy may have struck a group of UK climbers, including an Indian, on the Nanda Devi peak in India too as a section of climbers chose an uncharted  peak. The risks of the mountains are too well-known, but that won’t deter diehard adventure junkies. There’s also the strong belief that the dead are best left on the mountains, which are held sacred in folklore.

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