Lifestyle Books and Art 21 Oct 2021 Week-long Pichvai ex ...

Week-long Pichvai expo from tomorrow in Hyderabad

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | BANSARI TRIVEDI J
Published Oct 21, 2021, 2:55 am IST
Updated Oct 21, 2021, 1:11 pm IST
The exhibition aims to rejuvenate the Indian traditional art form of Pichvai
‘Threads of Devotion’ an exquisite collection of hand embroidered Pichvais and miniature paintings of Pushti Marg will be inaugurated at the B.M. Birla Science Centre in Hyderabad on Thursday. The exhibitin is being curated by Dr Anita Bharat Shah. (DC Image, S. Surender Reddy)
 ‘Threads of Devotion’ an exquisite collection of hand embroidered Pichvais and miniature paintings of Pushti Marg will be inaugurated at the B.M. Birla Science Centre in Hyderabad on Thursday. The exhibitin is being curated by Dr Anita Bharat Shah. (DC Image, S. Surender Reddy)

Hyderabad: ‘Threads of Devotion’, a unique exhibition of an exquisite collection of hand embroidered Pichvais and miniature paintings of Pushti Marg curated by Dr Anita Bharat Shah, art historian, is being held at the Nirmala Birla Gallery of Modern Art, Hyderabad. The exhibition aims to rejuvenate the Indian traditional art form of Pichvai.

Director of G P Birla Archaeological Astronomical and Scientific Research Institute, K.G. Kumar said the art works displayed upheld the authenticity of the museum and connected with the Birla Temple as well. “Our aim is to always promote original, antique, and pure art among the public” he said.

 

The objects on display will give the viewers a chance to understand the intricate works that were done in the earlier decades and are still being continued by a small section of traditional professionals in western India, believes Dr Anita. "The art displayed here, or anywhere should be looked at as a pure form of art and it should not be linked to any religion. It is a symbol of one’s traditions. Without the history and culture portrayed through the art, there is no identity of one's self. In this modern age, one has forgotten their culture,” she said.

 

She also said that the artworks displayed - embroidered Pichvais and miniature paintings - used to take days and months to be completed. It was majorly made by the Mochi community. The kings used to get these paintings and Pichvais made for their personal use. The art form is a way through which the people promoted their culture, way of living, devotion to lord Shreenathji.  She added that she and her husband, Bharat Shah, together collected the art works which belong from the 18th century.  

These selected embroidered Pichvais and miniature paintings from the Aabha Collection showcase how patronage and tradition were linked in the past. As these traditions weakened with modernisation, patronage deteriorated. By the mid-20th century, the function of these arts was reinterpreted to accommodate them as synthetic decorative features at home. This exhibition aims to bring Indian traditional arts to the forefront of public consciousness, so that they will rejuvenate and get a new lease of life, believes Dr Anita Shah.

 

The exhibits will be on display at B.M. Birla Science Centre on the 2nd floor, from October 22 to 28. The exhibition will be inaugurated in the presence of Goswami Prashant Kumarji of Brihan Mandir, Mumbai on Thursday at 5:30 pm.

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Location: India, Telangana, Hyderabad




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