Nation Other News 10 May 2020 4000 madarsas in Tel ...

4000 madarsas in Telangana left limping due to the lockdown

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | ATHER MOIN
Published May 10, 2020, 7:39 pm IST
Updated May 10, 2020, 7:39 pm IST
According to estimates, these madarsas cumulatively need Rs 1,000 crore per annum as almost every institution has boarding facilities
Students at Madrasa Imam Anwaarullah in Hyderabad (AFP file photo)
 Students at Madrasa Imam Anwaarullah in Hyderabad (AFP file photo)

Hyderabad: The coronavirus lockdown is having a major impact on the network of Deeni Madarsas in Telangana which impart religious instruction to about 60,000 students. That's because of the drastic decline in donations and charity during this month of Ramzan due to the impact of the coronavirus.

There are over 4,000 Deeni Madarsas in Telangana. According to estimates, these madarsas cumulatively need Rs 1,000 crore per annum as almost every institution has boarding facilities.

 

Many Deeni Madarsas are on the verge of closure as the managements are unable to mobilise the funds needed to keep operations going.  Even if the lockdown is lifted in the next few weeks, parents may not be ready to send their wards to these institutions.

The largest religious institution in Telangana the State is Jamia Nizamia, where about 1, 000 students are studying theology and other religious courses. It has 165 minor affiliated institutions. The institution’s annual expenditure is over Rs 6 crore.

Moreover, these madarsas have neither any revenue generating assets nor any regular sources of income. With no aid from the government, they, by and large, are dependent on charities and donations given by the community.

 

Dr Muftia Rizwana Parveen, head of Jamiat ul Mominath, an exclusive institution for girls and women, said the institutions have been running thanks to financial support from the community. Wealthy Muslims calculate their Zakat in the month of Ramzan, which helps cover 80 per cent of their expenditure.

To collect alms and charity, these institutions send their representatives to various places and install collection counters in front of mosques. However, the lockdown has ruled out this process.

She said due to the lockdown, the rich have diverted the usual contributions they make to Deeni Madarsas to feeding the poor. Once the lockdown is lifted, they may focus on reviving their business.

 

Devoid of much financial support, the madarsas will be forced to either close down or reduce intake. She exhorted the government to provide special grants and other incentives to the madarsas to ensure their survival.

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