Nation Other News 08 Sep 2021 14 of 50 houses in H ...

14 of 50 houses in Hyderabad harbour dengue mosquitoes: Survey

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | MADDY DEEKSHITH
Published Sep 8, 2021, 8:44 am IST
Updated Sep 8, 2021, 8:44 am IST
The city has reported 164 dengue cases already this season, a senior GHMC official said
Authorities also found the presence of culex and anopheles mosquitoes in water bodies. (Photo: Representational)
 Authorities also found the presence of culex and anopheles mosquitoes in water bodies. (Photo: Representational)

Hyderabad: An estimated 14 houses out every 50 in the GHMC area harbour the female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes which carry the dengue virus, a survey by the corporation's entomology wing has revealed.

The city has reported 164 dengue cases already this season, a senior GHMC official said. Officials also cautioned that the numbers could rise rapidly if steps were not taken to curb the spread of dengue.

 

The senior GHMC official said that several patients mistook the fever symptoms for Covid-19 and did not approach hospitals in time. They went only when their platelet count started plunging.

Authorities also found the presence of culex and anopheles mosquitoes in water bodies, though the corporation has said that it has carrried out anti-larval operations.

The Aedes aegypti which carries the dengue virus can travel up to a kilometre, and can infect residents in several houses. The mosquito breeds in standing water in garbage dumped in vacant plots. GHMC officials held citizens responsible for allowing stagnated water in their premises.

 

Stating that the widespread presence of the dengue-carrying mosquito was beyond the corporation's estimates, an official said: “Because of the continuous rainfall, citizens have ignored water stagnation points including spaces like discarded cups, coconut shells, unused tyres and unused air coolers.” These are places where the Aedes mosquito breeds.

“Locked houses are another menace. Despite the locked premises, water supply is not cut. The water remains in sumps and tanks which serve as good spots for mosquito breeding,” the official stated.

 

In many cases, the locked houses and offices are a direct fallout of the Covid-19 pandemic.

"Despite the GHMC's efforts, seasonal diseases could not be eradicated with public support. Colony welfare associations and local youth are being apprised of the harm that locked houses could cause, and they are being urged to take the initiative to empty water storage points,” the officials said.

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Location: India, Telangana, Hyderabad




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