Nation Current Affairs 29 Mar 2019 Kochi Biennale is pa ...

Kochi Biennale is part of Kerala society now, says Adoor Gopalakrishnan

DECCAN CHRONICLE.
Published Mar 29, 2019, 7:02 am IST
Updated Mar 29, 2019, 7:02 am IST
Curator Anita Dube said that she hoped to have delivered what she promised of bringing out a biennale that is more inclusive.
Filmmaker Adoor Gopalakrishnan greets curator Anita Dube after honouring her with a ponnada (golden-laced shawl) at the closing ceremony of 4th edition of Kochi – Muziris Biennale in the presence of Kochi Biennale Foundation president Bose Krishnamachari, in Kochi on Thursday.  (Photo: Sunoj ninan mathew )
 Filmmaker Adoor Gopalakrishnan greets curator Anita Dube after honouring her with a ponnada (golden-laced shawl) at the closing ceremony of 4th edition of Kochi – Muziris Biennale in the presence of Kochi Biennale Foundation president Bose Krishnamachari, in Kochi on Thursday. (Photo: Sunoj ninan mathew )

Kochi: The fourth edition of the Kochi Muziris Biennale wound up on Thursday with a closing ceremony where filmmaker Adoor Gopalakrishnan hailed it as one having become integral to Kerala society.

The renowned filmmaker remarked that the art festival could percolate to the sensibilities of even the common people.

 

Addressing the valedictory gathering at Durbar Hall ground, Adoor said Kerala can no more imagine its cultural future without the Biennale.  

There'll be a flag-lowering ceremony at Aspinwall House, the main venue of the event, in Fort Kochi, marking the conclusion of the 108-day festival.

The Biennale, curated by eminent artist Anita Dube, turned out to be the first to feature women totalling more than half of its participating artists who came out with 94 projects.

Bose Krishnamachari, president of the Kochi Biennale Foundation, said the latest edition clocked a total footfall of 6.2 lakh from across the country and abroad.

 

“We believe that the next edition will be bigger. In fact, from 2020, the Biennale will be extended up to 120 days,” he said.

Curator Anita Dube said that she hoped to have delivered what she promised of bringing out a biennale that is more inclusive.

“This biennale meant to show the struggle the women in society face in their day-to-day life,” she said.

“Through my curatorial efforts, I ensured that young artists get a platform to showcases their work.”

Kerala Tourism director P. Bala Kiran said the Biennale, coming within four months of the devastating August floods, helped the state regain its influx of travellers.

 

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