Nation Current Affairs 22 Sep 2019 Indian Muslims lucki ...

Indian Muslims luckier than those in Islamic countries: journalist Mark Tully

PTI
Published Sep 22, 2019, 4:02 pm IST
Updated Sep 22, 2019, 4:02 pm IST
‘India's spirit of tolerance is its strength which makes a harmonious environment for different religions to exist together,’ he also said.
Tully said that India is unique and is home to almost all the religions. ‘India has spirituality. As of now these religions are varied themselves. Muslims in India are much luckier than Muslims in the Islamic countries because in India they can worship in any Islamic tradition,’ he said.
 Tully said that India is unique and is home to almost all the religions. ‘India has spirituality. As of now these religions are varied themselves. Muslims in India are much luckier than Muslims in the Islamic countries because in India they can worship in any Islamic tradition,’ he said.

New Delhi: Veteran journalist Mark Tully, who has been residing in Delhi said, “Muslims in India are much luckier than those in the Islamic countries as they can worship in any Islamic tradition here.”

Tully says that in Delhi's Nizamuddin area, where he resides, there is the Tablighi Jamaat's headquarters and they are very strict and orthodox. “Next to it, there is the Sufi tradition where people pray at the tomb of Nizamuddin Auliya and sing qawwalis,” he added.

 

“India's spirit of tolerance is its strength which makes a harmonious environment for different religions to exist side by side,” Tully is quoted as saying in the latest issue of The Equator Line magazine. The issue is titled Home and The World.

Tully said that India is unique and is home to almost all the religions. “India has spirituality. As of now these religions are varied themselves. Muslims in India are much luckier than Muslims in the Islamic countries because in India they can worship in any Islamic tradition,” he said.

This issue of the magazine also has a piece by Tim Grandage, a Briton who came to Kolkata 32 years ago as a banking officer. He later gave up his job to set up a charity called Future Hope to work for slum children. Grandage says he learnt a lot from these children.

There are also essays by Bhaskar Chakravorti, dean of global business at The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University; US-based psychiatrist Reshma Hingorani; consultant and former UN staffer Sarthi Acharya and writer and television producer Jad Adams among others.

In the editorial, Bhaskar Roy writes that the real challenge for India is to go out meet the world upfront occupying as much space as our talent and capability permit, and also to restore and recover the backend from the abysmal chaos and dysfunction.

He says the 21st century India needs to navigate its anarchy and flaws to recover what has been already laid waste.

 

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Location: India, Delhi, New Delhi




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