Nation Current Affairs 17 Sep 2017 ‘Swachhta Hi S ...

‘Swachhta Hi Seva’ to help control infectious diseases

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | SHWETA TRIPATHI
Published Sep 17, 2017, 6:29 am IST
Updated Sep 17, 2017, 6:29 am IST
The equipment is being supplied to the upgraded hospitals and PHCs currently.
The campaign is being linked to improvement in health outcomes, as it would help to reduce the waterborne infections and control dengue.
 The campaign is being linked to improvement in health outcomes, as it would help to reduce the waterborne infections and control dengue.

Chennai: As the nationwide fortnight-long 'Swachhta Hi Seva', a campaign led by the Central government kickstarted on Friday, the state health department has high hopes that nationwide cleanliness and sanitation drive will bring down the cases of infectious diseases in the city.

The campaign is being linked to improvement in health outcomes, as it would help to reduce the waterborne infections and control dengue, which is on an alarming rise in the state. Health department officials said that domestic breeding check will boost up with the programme.

 

"'Swachhta Hi Seva' will help to create awareness on cleanliness and how it can help control vector-borne diseases. Medical and nursing students, NCC, NSS, Scouts, Nehru Yatra Kendras, philanthropists, NGOs and volunteers are to join hands in the cleanup," said public health director K. Kolandaisamy.

The public health department has instructed health facilities ranging from HSCs to medical colleges to carry out the cleanup. Various other strategies are planned up by the health department to control mosquito breeding post sanitation campaign.

 

"We are planning on a strategy to provide diagnostic and treatment facilities in upgraded PHCs and all government hospitals, other than district headquarters.

The equipment is being supplied to the upgraded hospitals and PHCs currently.

The district administration will also derive an action plan for dengue control with the help of a special committee along with the health department. Cell counters will be provided at Public Health Centers (PHCs) to provide for blood components," said Kolandaisamy.

He added that availability of equipment and treatment facilities at PHCs would help people from rural areas who have to travel to the city for tertiary care in case of viral fever, dengue and other waterborne diseases.

 

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