Nation Current Affairs 16 Mar 2019 Thought-matter link ...

Thought-matter link at Kochi-Muziris Biennale’s art show

DECCAN CHRONICLE.
Published Mar 16, 2019, 2:33 am IST
Updated Mar 16, 2019, 3:53 am IST
Project based on late US neuroscientist ‘Explorer of the Brain’ discovery.
The collateral project curated by artist Raju Sutar at Kochi Biennale.
 The collateral project curated by artist Raju Sutar at Kochi Biennale.

Kochi: Is there a connection between ‘thought’ and ‘matter’? What lies beyond them?

In a bid to address these complex questions through a large mixed-media art show, artist Raju Sutar has curated a collateral project of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale. The independent exhibition that runs parallel to the 108-day contemporary art festival, features five Pune-based artists, including Sutar.

 

The project, based on a discovery made by late American neuroscientist-pharmacologist Candace Beebe Pert, famously referred to as the ‘Explorer of the Brain’, established a link between what we think, feel and what is happening in human bodies, the curator said.

“She proved that thought actually creates a type of chemical protein in the brain. In reality, it’s a piece of matter,” says Sutar, 48.

Through the exhibition, the artist-curator initiates a dialogue between discoveries around thought /matter and different forms of contemporary art. “If thought is also a matter, where do ideas of conceptual art and other contemporary expressions stand? How does it work on our minds? In fact, I am interested in finding what is not thought,” says Sutar, who works in both traditional as well as digital art forms.

 

Besides Sutar, the other participating artists are Kathak-trained contemporary dancer Hrishikesh Pawar, Rajesh Kulkarni who has showcased a large clay-based work, painter Sandip Sonawane and Vaishali Oak, who works with fabrics. Each artist has presented a unique interpretation of the collateral’s theme, which is titled ‘Thought is also a Matter’.

The collateral, mounted in Fort Kochi’s Jew Town area, deploys a wide range of mediums that call out the viewer’s attention because of their large scale and innovative art production. These include various life-size paintings by Sonawane and Sutar, who use a lot of geometrical forms, patterns and flat colours to decode ‘thought’.

 

Sonawane, 53, speaking about his acrylic works that show different geometrical shapes, says, “Three lines are used to create a triangle while four lines can make a square. The idea is to break down the thoughts in a similar way.”

Oak’s colourful fabric assemblages, on the other hand, use the metaphor of ‘seeds of thoughts’ to dwell on the show’s theme with striking designs, layers and patterns.

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