Nation Current Affairs 11 Jul 2019 Vijayawada: 15th cen ...

Vijayawada: 15th century inscription found

DECCAN CHRONICLE.
Published Jul 11, 2019, 1:59 am IST
Updated Jul 11, 2019, 2:19 am IST
Remnant of Gajapati dynasty is priceless
Archaeologist E. Sivanagi Reddy with the Ganesha idol.
 Archaeologist E. Sivanagi Reddy with the Ganesha idol.

Vijayawada: A 15th century Telugu inscription lies uncared at Jakkampudi, a village located on the outskirts of Vijayawada city. This is worrying archaeologists and epigraphists said E. Sivanagi Reddy, CEO, the Cultural Centre of Vijayawada and Amaravati.

Dr Reddy inspected the inscription on Wednesday as part of the awareness programme ‘Preserve Heritage for Posterity’ launched by the CCVA. The Telugu inscription carved on a black granite was issued by Kumara Hamviradeva, the eldest son of Kapileswaradeva, the founder of the Gajapati dynasty who ruled from Puri in Odisha.

 

Dr Reddy, after reading the inscription, said that Hamviradeva, who conquered the southern tracts up to Rameswaram in Tamil Nadu from the Vijayanagara ruler Mallikarjunadeva was camping at Bezawada  around 1464 AD, gifted the village Jakkireddypalle (Jakkampudi) towards the daily offerings of incense, light and holy food for Papavinasanadevara, Rudradevatas and also towards the maintenance of the Jangama and Brahmin choultries at Bezawada located on the banks of the river Krishna.

While examining the inscription, it came to his notice that a 15th century AD Ganesa idol representing the Gajapati art style was reported from the neighbouring fields.

Based on the historical, epigraphical and geopolitical significance of the inscription and the Ganesa idol, Dr Reddy appealed to the state government to shift them to the Victoria Jubilee Museum.

A 15th century Telugu inscription lies uncared at Jakkampudi, a village located on the outskirts of Vijayawada city. This is worrying archaeologists and epigraphists said E. Sivanagi Reddy, CEO, the Cultural Centre of Vijayawada and Amaravati.

Dr Reddy inspected the inscription on Wednesday as part of the awareness programme ‘Preserve Heritage for Posterity’ launched by the CCVA. The Telugu inscription carved on a black granite was issued by Kumara Hamviradeva, the eldest son of Kapileswaradeva, the founder of the Gajapati dynasty who ruled from Puri in Odisha.

Dr Reddy, after reading the inscription, said that Hamviradeva, who conquered the southern tracts up to Rameswaram in Tamil Nadu from the Vijayanagara ruler Mallikarjunadeva was camping at Bezawada  around 1464 AD, gifted the village Jakkireddypalle (Jakkampudi) towards the daily offerings of incense, light and holy food for Papavinasanadevara, Rudradevatas and also towards the maintenance of the Jangama and Brahmin choultries at Bezawada located on the banks of the river Krishna.

While examining the inscription, it came to his notice that a 15th century AD Ganesa idol representing the Gajapati art style was reported from the neighbouring fields.

Based on the historical, epigraphical and geopolitical significance of the inscription and the Ganesa idol, Dr Reddy appealed to the state government to shift them to the Victoria Jubilee Museum.

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