Nation Current Affairs 08 Nov 2019 Writer Aatish Taseer ...

Writer Aatish Taseer loses OCI status, govt says he hid info on Pakistani father

PTI
Published Nov 8, 2019, 7:59 am IST
Updated Nov 8, 2019, 7:59 am IST
Reacting to govt statement, Taseer wrote on Twitter that he was not given 21 days to reply to the notice but just 24 hrs.
The 38-year-old writer is the son of late Pakistani politician Salmaan Taseer and Indian journalist Tavleen Singh. (Photo: File)
 The 38-year-old writer is the son of late Pakistani politician Salmaan Taseer and Indian journalist Tavleen Singh. (Photo: File)

New Delhi: British-born writer Aatish Ali Taseer stands to lose the Overseas Citizen of India (OCI) card as he allegedly concealed the fact that his father was of Pakistani origin.

A Home Ministry spokesperson said Taseer became ineligible to hold an OCI card, as per the Citizenship Act, 1955, as the OCI card was not issued to any person whose parents or grandparents are Pakistanis and he hid this fact.

 

Taseer has clearly not complied with very basic requirements and hidden information, the spokesperson said.

As per the Citizenship Act, if the registration as an OCI card holder was obtained by means of fraud, false representation or concealment of any material fact, the registration as OCI card holder shall be cancelled. The person will also be blacklisted thereby banning his or her future entry into India.

The 38-year-old writer is the son of late Pakistani politician Salmaan Taseer and Indian journalist Tavleen Singh.

The home ministry spokesperson said Taseer was given the opportunity to submit his reply/objection regarding his Person of India Origin/OCI cards, but he failed to dispute the notice.

The spokesperson also denied that the government had been considering revoking Taseer's OCI card after he wrote an article in the Time magazine, which was critical of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, saying the news was a "complete misrepresentation and is devoid of any facts".

Reacting to the home ministry statement, Taseer wrote on Twitter that he was not given 21 days to reply to the home ministry notice but just 24 hours.

"This is untrue. Here is the Consul General's acknowledgment of my reply. I was given not the full 21 days, but rather 24 hours to reply. I've heard nothing from the ministry since," he said.

 

Catch the latest news, live coverage and in-depth analyses from India and World. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

...
Location: India, Delhi




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT