Lifestyle Environment 06 Oct 2022 Rains may force migr ...

Rains may force migratory birds to look for new avenues in Andhra Pradesh

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | SAMPAT G SAMARITAN
Published Oct 6, 2022, 11:55 pm IST
Updated Oct 6, 2022, 11:55 pm IST
Migratory species like lack-tailed godwit, marsh sandpiper, northern pintail, little stint, red crested pochard and resident species including fulvous whistling duck, spot billed pelican (in picture), open billed stork, painted stork and others may be spotted. —  DC File Image
 Migratory species like lack-tailed godwit, marsh sandpiper, northern pintail, little stint, red crested pochard and resident species including fulvous whistling duck, spot billed pelican (in picture), open billed stork, painted stork and others may be spotted. — DC File Image

Vijayawada: As AP witnesses continuous rainfall filling up all major water bodies, migratory birds may have to look for new avenues for landing and to find feed at their regular places of visit, the water bodies.

Nearly 140 to 150 species of migratory birds including black-tailed godwit, marsh sandpiper, northern pintail, little stint, red crested pochard etc, with a population of three to four lakh, will arrive in parts of AP every season. They mainly converge at Kolleru, Coringa and Pulicat bird/wildlife sanctuaries during mid-October and remain there up to March.

They come from the northern hemisphere to avoid inclement weather, like extreme cold conditions or less daylight and feeding time in their home habitats. Some species of resident birds like fulvous whistling duck, spot billed pelican, open billed stork, painted stork etc can also be spotted.

Water bodies with less water are ideal spots for them to catch their feed.

AP has been witnessing multiple spells of rainfall since the commencement of the southwest monsoon. It recorded an actual rainfall of 638.1mm against a normal rainfall of 625.1mm with a deviation of 2.1 per cent from June 1 to October 6.

A majority out of the 26 districts recorded normal rainfall while three districts -- Baptala, Anantapur and Sri Satya Sai -- recorded excess rainfall during the same period.

As many as 29 mandals received large excess rainfall, 172 mandals excess rainfall, 386 mandals normal rainfall and 92 mandals deficient rainfall.

Several parts of AP have been receiving good rainfall.

As all major water bodies are having huge quantum of water, ornithologists are apprehensive that the birds may find it difficult to land and stay put in their regular habitats and get feed. They may look for new avenues for rest and feed.

These birds survive by eating small birds, fish, worms, phytoplankton etc.

Deccan Birders secretary Bhamidipati Srikanth said, “We are expecting the arrival of nearly 140 species of migratory birds from the Himalayas, several European countries, Siberia and from the northern hemisphere to parts of AP for nesting and brooding but not for breeding.”

“As the state has been experiencing continuous rainfall, the regular habitats of these birds have been filled with water and we are assuming that they may have to look for new avenues for a comfortable stay.”

These birds face the threat of hunting for their meat and the bird experts along with foresters are getting ready to take up sensitization programmes among the local people to avoid such a practice, apart from exploring several legal provisions that could serve as a deterrent.

Kakinada district forest officer IKV Raju said, “We are expecting the arrival of around 120 species of migratory birds to the Coringa wildlife sanctuary this season from November. We have identified mudflats and where they stay put. We are also taking up protective measures by sensitizing villages on their protection.”

So is the case with the forest authorities at Kolleru and Pulicat sanctuaries and at other places where they have started preparatory works for the arrival of migratory birds and their protection.

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