Nation Current Affairs 03 Nov 2018 Chennai: Archaeologi ...

Chennai: Archaeologists to take support of Isro

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | KATHELENE ANTONY
Published Nov 3, 2018, 6:35 am IST
Updated Nov 3, 2018, 6:35 am IST
The department is undertaking only one other excavation - in Pattaraiperumbudur in neighbouring Thiruvallur district.
Keezhadi excavation
 Keezhadi excavation

Chennai: The department of archaeology, Tamil Nadu, has approached the Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) for the first time to assist with the use of GPR and satellite imaging, so that archaeologists can know what to look for and where, with accuracy.

Commissioner of the State Department of Archaeology, T. Udhayachandran said that while they were discussing, the details have not been figured out yet. While exploring, GPR and RE technology are used so that the exact location of the material can be found.

 

“The nature of the material and other structures can also be determined,” said R. Sivanantham, deputy director of the state department of archaeology. “Such things will save immense time and manpower. We will not be searching in the dark,” he added. Experts from the Geology department of the Bharathidasan University and Periyar University have been approached for a tie-up in this new technological venture, the deputy director said.

Speaking of the excavations in Keezhadi which began in April 2017, , the commissioner said that they have completed the fourth phase, adding that they have applied for, and are awaiting permission from the Archaeological Survey of India to file the reports. Documentation will be taken up soon, he said.

 

The department is undertaking only one other excavation - in Pattaraiperumbudur in neighbouring Thiruvallur district. “Surrounded by pre-historic sites, including Gudiyam and Attirampakkam, Pattaraiperumbudur is a promising site with a huge deposit of antiquities,” Sivanantham said. He recalled how those engaged in the excavation were stunned to find the remains of a ring well made of terracotta in the region. He said.

“What is interesting is that this is the first place in Tamil Nadu where we've seen settlements from the Upper Paleolithic period to the modern period. There is no other place like this in the state,” he said. They also found a brick well which they have not found anywhere else. “A near 17 feet well was dug, and our whole team was surprised. When they further dug, water gushed out and we were forced to stop,” Sivanantham said.

 

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