Nation Current Affairs 03 May 2018 Polluted air behind ...

Polluted air behind deaths by chronic pulmonary ailments

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | KANIZA GARARI
Published May 3, 2018, 1:53 am IST
Updated May 3, 2018, 1:53 am IST
The rising incidence is being seen as a direct effect of poor indoor and outdoor air quality.
Air pollution is a risk factor for non-communicable diseases and is an estimated cause of death in 24 per cent of adults from heart attacks, 25 per cent from stroke, 43 per cent from COPD and 29 per cent from lung cancer. (Representational image)
 Air pollution is a risk factor for non-communicable diseases and is an estimated cause of death in 24 per cent of adults from heart attacks, 25 per cent from stroke, 43 per cent from COPD and 29 per cent from lung cancer. (Representational image)

Hyderabad: In a majority of Indian cities, one of the foremost natural causes of death is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This is the view of experts on the data released by World Health Organisation (WHO) about the poor air quality in the country’s major cities. Experts say regular warnings have been issued since 2016 and the incidence of respiratory diseases tracked in order to understand how deteriorating air quality is affecting lives.

Air pollution is a risk factor for non-communicable diseases and is an estimated cause of death in 24 per cent adults from heart attacks, 25 per cent from stroke, 43 per cent from COPD and 29 per cent from lung cancer. The rising incidence is being seen as a direct effect of poor indoor and outdoor air quality. Both short and long-term exposure to ambient air pollution is the reason for reduced lung function, respiratory infections and also aggravated cases of wheezing, coughing, tightness of the chest, and breathing problems.

 

Senior respiratory medicine consultant Sandeep Nayar said, “Small particulate matter in the air affects the lungs.Constant exposure causes respiratory infections and also aggravates asthma. Long-term constant exposure reduces lung functioning. This is particularly true of those who are constantly exposed to large amounts of dust and are regular smokers.”

Experts insist there is an urgent need to address the problem. Senior consultant pulmonologist and respiratory intensivist Ramana P Velamuru said, “Some people have genetic abnormalities like small airways, abnormal gene patterns and other conditions. They comprise the most vulnerable segment,and are the first to suffer when air quality deteriorates.” 

 

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Location: India, Telangana, Hyderabad




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