Lifestyle Viral and Trending 30 Aug 2019 Will you choose choc ...

Will you choose chocolate this Chaturthi?

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | SITARA SURESH NAIDU
Published Aug 30, 2019, 12:01 am IST
Updated Aug 30, 2019, 12:02 am IST
Ganesha Chaturthi is just around the corner and everyone is getting creative with their choice of murtis.
Priya Jain’s edible chocolate Ganeshas.
 Priya Jain’s edible chocolate Ganeshas.

Can you really have your Ganesha and eat chocolate too? Priya Jain, who has been a chocolatier for over five years, might just make this miracle possible. Priya, who loves festivities, says, “Ganesha Chaturthi is a fun festival for all, especially for kids. I always wanted to do something to add to the celebrations. So, when a client asked if I could make a chocolate Ganesha, I said ‘yes’ first and decided to figure the how later.”

That was the start of a sensational new trend. Since then, she has not only figured out how to do it, but has also scaled it up so she can cater to the demand for this unique need. She explains, “The Ganesha is made with oil, cocoa butter, cocoa powder, sugar, vanilla flavour and nuts, jelly and raisins, if required. I use both food-grade plastic and rubber moulds that are 100 percent safe and reusable.” Speaking about how long the process of making this delectable Ganesha idol takes, she says, “Because there are a lot of orders, I have figured out how to speed up the process. I am happy to say that now I can turn out a Ganesha in just three hours. It is a five-step process. The chocolate is melted, tempered, blended with other ingredients and poured into moulds. Once it sets, it is packed and dispatched. People can also pick it up from my location in a container of their choice to completely avoid any plastic.”

 

When asked if her creativity might strike the wrong chord with religious families, she says, “Modern problems require modern solutions. While I can’t speak for everyone, creating a 100 percent edible Ganesha has to be good for the environment and the eco-system. Those who are not comfortable eating it, still have the option of completing visarjan and using the water in the garden where ants and insects can partake of it. And even if the immersion takes place in a water body, this is definitely less dangerous than say, plaster of Paris and paints with heavy metals. There are groups that plan to use this Ganesha for visarjan in milk and distribute that to the needy.”

 

Sharing a word on the response to her rational solution, she offers, “It is a very new idea. The response has been very warm. People want something that is eco-friendly and pocket-friendly and this fits right into the bracket.”

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