Lifestyle Viral and Trending 25 Jun 2019 In ‘safe’ hands ...

In ‘safe’ hands while at work!

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | PRIYA RATHNAM
Published Jun 25, 2019, 12:00 am IST
Updated Jun 25, 2019, 12:02 am IST
Prominent panelists from across the country shared their views on women empowerment and nightlife at an initiative for women’s safety in the city.
Monika Dogra
 Monika Dogra

The Sisterhood Soiree is a local organisation that has come up with an initiative for women’s safety while out at night in Bengaluru. Indian Nightlife Convention and Awards along with a liquor brand held an interesting panel discussion in the city recently. The panelists offered their insights on women’s security and the  standards followed.  

“Communication is very important,” said Nikki Ponappa, professional golfer and coach and the founder of The Coorg Wellness Foundation. “Our Indian system is built in such a way where women discouraged other women to go out and work. But the cultural shift encouraged a drastic change where we are now equal to our male counterparts. This change has lead to progress where women are able assert themselves now. They are now in a better position to convince their families to work late at night. But it is also the government responsibility to provide security to the ladies.”   

 

Women with their work in almost every field are having said that, the security provided at workplaces today is commendable. This coupled with support from the family will enable a women to achieve her goals.”

Concurs Riyaaz Amlani,  the CEO and MD of Impresario Entertainment & Hospitality Pvt. Ltd, “The change should not just to be made but must be followed too. This cultural sensitisation helped in paving the way for change. For more things to happen, talking and normalising is what we can do.”

Riyaaz opines that women always put their families first. So families must support them and encourage their journey ahead. And I would rather say encouragement than empowerment. Because the cultural shift helped one understands the ability of women. So it is the encouragement which a woman has to receive.”

Actress Ragini Dwiwedi is of the opinion that the change has already started. “What is needed though is more encouragement which helps women achieve their goals.  Nightlife should not be any hindrance to their professional ambitions.”

Monika Dogra, American actress and musician of Indian origin, says, “My mom was a singer and after she passed away, I started singing a lot. With a lot of practice in music,  I could perform as well. I like djing because I don’t stick to any genre and I can dance to the music I like. That is how I ended up djing. But my dad is concerned as he worries for my safety.  But as an NRI, I belieive, this incredibly diversified place called India attracts many. So the politicians have the responsibility of assuring safe spaces for the citizens here.”

Angeera Mukherjee, lady bartender at the Koramangala Social, a cafe/co-working space says, “It was quite difficult for me to convince my parents that I wish to work . It was 10 years ago where the perception of people was lot more different. Back then with less exposure to clubs, convincing my parents was a tough job and still couldn’t manage it. But the momentous development helped women like us to work in night jobs and thankfully it has brcomr more common now. But still when I’m at the table mixing drinks, I get to hear ‘Hey babes’ or some nasty comments.”

Female bartenders, DJs and bouncers are in demand these days where women were seen handling these roles with aplomb. All the panelists collectively said that women’s security lies in their hands and their choices too. Given the right support and the requisite security for their safety will go a long way in ensuring that women enjoy their nights at work.

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT