Hear the silent no

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | DYUTI BASU
Published Jan 16, 2018, 12:00 am IST
Updated Jan 16, 2018, 12:12 am IST
With Aziz Ansari accused of assault by a woman who went on a date with him, women speak about the nitty-gritty of consent and reading cues.
Aziz Ansari
 Aziz Ansari

Aziz Ansari has often been a name associated with feminism. However, even as the actor of Tamil origin was walking up to the receive his Golden Globe award with a "Time's Up" badge pinned to his lapel as a clear indication of his support for the movement, a woman watching the show was reliving her harrowing experience with the comedian when he refused to understand the word 'no'.

Grace, as this woman has been called in the article that has gone viral on the Internet since Sunday, had gone with Aziz on a date. She had then gone back with him to his apartment. She had allowed him to kiss her and had not left immediately when he had touched her in a way that made her feel violated.
However, she does recall giving both verbal and non-verbal cues throughout the night that indicated she was uncomfortable and wanted to stop.

 

As is usually the case when such a piece goes viral, opinionated factions on the Internet have kicked up a storm of debate. While many side with Grace, and are completely sympathetic to her plight, others have pointed out that she did not push him away when he asked her to indulge in foreplay. She did not slap him and leave.

Ever the "feminist", Aziz responded to the entire matter much the same way as he had when she had reprimanded him the day after the assault. His statement read, "It was true that everything did seem OK to me, so when I heard that it was not the case for her, I was surprised and concerned. I took her words to heart and responded privately after taking the time to process what she had said. I continue to support the movement that is happening in our culture ... It is necessary and long overdue."

 

While a blame game is the easiest reaction to this situation, the cause of the problem is more deep-rooted, says Kiran Manral. "We are so conditioned to go along with what a man wants and not create a scene. Right from when we are children we are asked to hug an uncle, perform a song for someone, kiss someone's cheek, whether we want to or not. Now that more and more women are speaking up about the issue, there will hopefully be a change. On the other hand, men need to be taught sensitivity so that they can pick up on non-verbal cues," she suggests.

 

Author and feminist Meghana Pant, also speaks about the lack of agency in women who need to convey their “no” loudly enough. “I always support ‘me too’ stories but it is really difficult to call this a sexual assault. It seems more to me like a case of misread signals. While he should have read the cues better, she too, should have stopped him if she was feeling violated. While I’m not undermining the fact that she had a harrowing experience, I really do think that calling it sexual assault is going too far,” she muses.

 

Kiran agrees wholeheartedly, saying, “Perhaps if women were to speak to men more openly about encounters that have made them uncomfortable, they would also realise the times that they have made a woman uncomfortable. A hand on a knee may seem innocuous to a man, but it still makes a woman uneasy.

Ultimately, it is not just about consent but also boundaries. The hasee toh phasee mentality is not just prevalent in India, but across the world. And the idea that you need to pursue a reluctant woman and woo her is just ridiculous. We are no longer living in those times.”

 

“It is obviously violence against women and sexual abuse, from what she says we could infer from the girl named ‘Grace’, she did not want to advance further though she had shown initial interest. Any woman has a right not to have sexual intercourse with a man whom she has discomfort. A clear communication seems to have been made by her verbally and non-verbally and when this was not respected by Aziz Ansari then it is only by “force” that one can advance to other levels. It is also showing the way that how some men are brought up in India, TN where the society primarily is favouring patriarchal values and .The children in many houses are also brought up in such a way that they feel “men” are superior to women and can “get away” with anything, though it is not the case with all,” says Chennai-based Dr. Nalini Keshavaraj, gender sensitisation trainer.

 

Abha Singh says, “Legally, there is little one can do in a situation like Aziz Ansari. If there is no medical or circumstantial evidence of an assault, then the case would not hold up in a court of law. These matters usually have an out-of-court settlement, with the injured party settling for a sum of money. This creates a question about authenticity. The law shouldn’t allow these cases to be withdrawn once lodged. But unfortunately, the party that lodges the complaint can withdraw it. That’s where cases of extortion creep in, and also a major reason why a woman’s credibility is questioned.”

 

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