Simplicity & soul

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | HARISH KUMAR SEJEKAN
Published Dec 15, 2018, 12:09 am IST
Updated Dec 15, 2018, 12:09 am IST
MS Murthy’s simple but evocative works of art have the power to transform people’s moods.
The Bowl by MS Murthy
 The Bowl by MS Murthy

“The true use of art is, first, to cultivate the artist’s own spiritual nature.”
 —  George Inness

There are inspirations and there are great stories. MS Murthy’s journey as an artist has been very meditative, filled with peace, far away from the cruel egos and competitiveness which unfortunately grips many. Murthy has been a wanderer and his work has been the finest example of simplicity. One look at his paintings, and chances are that it will completely transform the mood into a meditative sense of calm. 

 

Back after a long hiatus of almost a decade before he last showcased his works as a solo exhibit, Murthy’s oeuvre has undergone a delightful shift. One thing that has been consistent and also associated with his work is simplicity. Delicate lines, with undertones of subtle light colour epitomises the Buddhist preaching and thoughts, which has been the source of inspiration for the artist in his current series. 

 The Bowl has been his muse and the way he has explored multiple possibilities with just a simple object makes his work unique and out of the world. In his work, art and philosophy meet canvas, transporting the viewer to a calm nearly quiet, thoughtful state even as the eye is attracted to the delightful composition of hues, its numerous layers and lines. The easy and effortless brushstrokes reflect straightforwardness simplicity and economy of movement; in the mean while, being a delicate, exploration of a space within and without, reminiscent of abstract greats, like Barnett Newman, Mark Rothko, in the rendering of his “colour fields.”

 

His forms have the elegance and simplicity of Alexander Calder. He surrounds himself in a workspace that mirrors his own contemplative soul, as a haven of green, drawing from the harmony that never ceases to engulf all who chance upon nature. 

 Murthy’s art and life have reached a stage when he is compelled to look back at his past as well as to consider the future, that future flowing from, embracing and summarising his previous experience, continuing it while growing further with a partly new perspective. Murthy’s water colours and oil works of art dug into his Buddhist motivation while progressively utilising high abstraction to capture spiritual and philosophical insights. Retaining the authenticity and modesty of his conviction, and premonition, he avoids literal narratives, instead focussing on simple yet intense sensations that in an indirect manner evoke broader and more defined viewpoints. 

 

The show is a must-visit. It is being held at Gallery Manora till January 12.

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