65th Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra56948179181897 Tamil Nadu185459909136 Delhi152577264303 Gujarat152057549938 Rajasthan79474566178 Madhya Pradesh72613927313 Uttar Pradesh69913991182 West Bengal41921578289 Andhra Pradesh3245213359 Bihar300680014 Karnataka249379347 Punjab2106191840 Telangana2098132163 Jammu and Kashmir192185426 Odisha16608877 Haryana138183818 Kerala10885558 Assam832884 Uttarakhand493794 Jharkhand4621914 Chandigarh3641894 Chhatisgarh364830 Tripura2421650 Himachal Pradesh223634 Goa68370 Puducherry49170 Meghalaya20121 Nagaland1800 Manipur540 Arunachal Pradesh210 Mizoram110 Sikkim100
Lifestyle Viral and Trending 14 Dec 2017 British astronomers ...

British astronomers name new constellations Usain Bolt, Harry Potter

AFP
Published Dec 14, 2017, 2:22 pm IST
Updated Dec 14, 2017, 2:22 pm IST
The eight constellations invented are a bid to get more young people interested in the universe.
British astronomers have come up with a new set of constellations inspired by modern-day figures. (Photo: Pixabay)
 British astronomers have come up with a new set of constellations inspired by modern-day figures. (Photo: Pixabay)

LONDON:  British astronomers have come up with a new set of constellations inspired by modern-day figures such as Harry Potter and Usain Bolt in an attempt to teach children about the layout of the universe.

The eight new constellations in the "Look Up to The Stars" project are the brainchild of The Big Bang Fair, a science education event for young people and astronomers at the University of Birmingham.

 

The proposals include Harry Potter's glasses, a tennis racket for Serena Williams, a spaceship for astronaut Tim Peak, a blue whale for naturist David Attenborough and a book in honour of Nobel-winner Malala Yousafzai.

The eight constellations invented are a bid "to get more young people interested in the universe," The Big Bang Fair said in a statement.
      
Existing constellations are based on the zodiac and figures from ancient Greek and Roman mythology which "aren't necessarily proving successful in enticing children today to look up at the stars," it said.

A survey quoted by The Big Bang Fair found 29 percent of seven to 19-year-olds admitted they would not be able to recognise a single classical constellation.

The survey also found 72 percent of children admitted they had never looked for a constellation at night.

"We really hope these new creations will help people of all ages develop their interest in space and astronomy," Emma Willett, who led the University of Birmingham research team, said in the statement.

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT