Lifestyle Viral and Trending 11 Jun 2019 Juggling his passion ...

Juggling his passion and job

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | ANNETT MANOJ
Published Jun 11, 2019, 1:22 am IST
Updated Jun 11, 2019, 1:22 am IST
Jeemon Antony is perhaps the only policeman who is a professional dirt bike rider in the state.
 When asked about the experience, he says, “This is an expensive sport and when I began racing in 2000, I was unemployed.
  When asked about the experience, he says, “This is an expensive sport and when I began racing in 2000, I was unemployed.

Flags flutter, helmets on, full throttle and when the gun is fired, he owns the track with his Royal Enfield Himalayan. Jeemon Antony chased his dual passions to become a cop and to carry the title of a professional dirt bike rider. He has taken part in many races across the country, winning laurels and setting himself apart as a passionate lover of this sport.

His first bike Yamaha RX 135 was recommended by a biker friend, Binu John, who turned out to be his biggest inspiration and the reason for him to start racing on tracks. When asked about the experience, he says, “This is an expensive sport and when I began racing in 2000, I was unemployed. Injuries and financial constraints tagged along and hence I called it quits in 2008, which was an imperative decision I had to take for myself.”

 

In 2009, he joined the police force and after a gap of 11 years, he made a huge comeback and is to participate in MRF MOGRIP’s Indore National Rally championship on June 15 and 16 with five other riders from Kochi.

Being a rider who loves to travel, the most exciting one of his journeys was the one to Leh in Ladakh, a trip he would cherish for a lifetime. “What is life without a bit of exploring, when everything you want to see is just roads away,” he says.

Jeemon won the Kakkoor Kalavayal Dirt Race 2018, which had riders from all over India. Being a cop and a rider, he manages to handle both roles together. The gear and other parts are quite expensive and without sponsors, it is indeed a challenging ride. “The bike is carried on a truck to the track where I race. I never usually ride my racing bike on city roads as people tend to criticize.”

Ask him about the next milestone he wishes to accomplish and he says, “I would want to go on a ‘Ride Himalaya’ adventure.” Racing is titled ‘death wish’ by many traditionalists, and is criticised extensively. Slow changes in attitude can be seen and a hope that no judgment maybe passed for following one’s passion is something we can anticipate in the near future. Jeemon Antony advocates this through his actions.

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT