Lifestyle Viral and Trending 07 Feb 2016 With her head held h ...

With her head held high

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | ARPITHA RAO
Published Feb 7, 2016, 12:00 am IST
Updated Feb 9, 2016, 4:30 pm IST
We see how TV ads are portraying the new-age woman as daring and confident enough to embracing their sexuality.
Skore’s ad on women using condoms.
 Skore’s ad on women using condoms.

Women using condoms, a lesbian couple introducing each other to the parents; divorcees/single moms remarrying — advertisements on the following, are certainly paving way for progress. They reflect positive changes women face in daily life — and thanks to social media, are reaching viewers far and wide. We speak to industry experts, feminists and LGBT activists to understand their take on groundbreaking ad films.

‘How can I decide on my life partner just based on feeding him samosas?’ questioned actress Regina Cassandra, in an advertisement. It spoke about the need for a man to step up and take on responsibilities, as much as a woman. “I accepted the ad because I agree with the ideology. We’ve identified the problem that women face; there are umpteen solutions and now people are finally implementing them,” says Regina. On the feedback the advertisement received, she says, “We got an overwhelming response — men from various walks of life are appreciating the ad. Many women I know personally have the power to be somebody, but are told from birth that they can’t do what a man does. It needs to change. That’s where commercials like these step in and say that we can be better, if not equal to men!”

 

GS Shridhar, former executive vice president at Lowe & Lintas says that even though films are a stronger medium than ads, commercials have their advantages too. “Ad films mirror the current sentiments of society. Audiences which these cater to, are looking at women as free, independent people — they acknowledge the changing trend in society,” he says. He feels that instead of creating a single ad, campaigns or series are more effective.

Having worked on an ad where lesbians coming out of the closet was portrayed as a welcome change, Shridhar says, “Irreverent, bold and provocative was the motto behind the ad. Especially at a time when the Supreme Court has taken the decision to revisit Section 377, advertisements pertaining to the LGBT community are a great thing.”

 

Women’s rights activist and president of the Tamil Nadu Women’s Collective, Sheelu, feels that pro-women ads are a need of the hour. “Such visuals create a strong impact on the minds of youngsters, especially children. But just the ideology of feminism is not enough; women need to become economically independent. This will gain them respect from society as well as their families.”

Sujatha (name changed for confidentiality) says, “I came out of the closet a few years ago — yes, my family knows that I’m with a woman.” This graduate of fashion designing feels that ads promoting women making their choices, will encourage others like her to take the bold step. “Commercials are promoting women to live by their rules. I personally feel that I have fewer people to blame when I make a decision for myself — I wish more families support their daughters; who knows what they’re going through but are shy due to ‘log kya kahenge’? Throw taboos out the window, welcome the change of women living by #herlifeherchoices (tagline of Katrina Kaif’s ad on women getting married),” she concludes.

 

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
-->