137th Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra49026232728117092 Tamil Nadu2850242275754690 Andhra Pradesh2069601204641842 Karnataka164924842322998 Delhi1427231282324082 Uttar Pradesh113378668341981 West Bengal89666630601954 Bihar7179446294400 Gujarat68855517922604 Assam5549737225132 Rajasthan4941835186763 Odisha4255028698292 Haryana4005433444467 Madhya Pradesh3729827621962 Kerala3170019147103 Jammu and Kashmir2392716218449 Punjab2193014040539 Jharkhand165427503154 Chhatisgarh11408831987 Uttarakhand89015731112 Goa7947559570 Telangana751354330615 Tripura6014408437 Puducherry5123291475 Manipur3466192610 Himachal Pradesh3206200813 Nagaland26578247 Arunachal Pradesh204913263 Chandigarh137482023 Meghalaya10234236 Sikkim8544061 Mizoram5672890
Lifestyle Viral and Trending 02 Dec 2019 Different strokes an ...

Different strokes and a continuum

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | SWATI SHARMA
Published Dec 2, 2019, 12:48 am IST
Updated Dec 2, 2019, 12:48 am IST
An ongoing art exhibition at Gallery Space gives a glimpse of the impressive works of four artists.
Anjaneyulu G’s works give iconic status to mundane objects around us, making one sit up and take keen notice.
 Anjaneyulu G’s works give iconic status to mundane objects around us, making one sit up and take keen notice.

An art show titled ‘Space-Time Continuum’ is on display featuring works of four impressive artists — Sachin Jaltare, Ramesh Gorjala, Bratin Khan and Anjaneyulu G — who have, for decades, marked their signature styles of paintings in the industry, sharing a congeneric subject matter. The four artists have come together to showcase diverse works inspired by the mundane and mythology.

Sachin Jaltare’s exhibited works combine figurative and abstract elements to entwine an enthralling narrative that is both authentically Indian and contemporary. The visual vocabulary is minimalistic and geometrical. Speaking about the exhibition, the artist says, “It’s like a dance and rhythm of form and the formless. The more I started thinking about Shiva, spirituality and symbolism, the more I found myself moving towards abstracts.”

 

Bratin Khan is greatly influenced by the Bengal school of art and Rajasthani miniature paintings.Bratin Khan is greatly influenced by the Bengal school of art and Rajasthani miniature paintings.

Bratin Khan, another of the eminent artists whose works are on display, is greatly influenced by the Bengal school of art and Rajasthani miniature paintings. And the influences are evident in his brushstrokes and his handling of colour. The subjects he uses mostly belong to Indian mythology, religion and folklore.

“My colour palette is inspired by the earth — the flora and fauna are my dearest elements. However, unlike a dance performance or a drama, a painting captures only a single moment of a particular scene, so one can’t paint the whole life of an enlightened person such as Buddha, Jesus or Krishna in just one painting,” says Bratin, a graduate from Visva Bharati University in Shantiniketan, West Bengal.

 

Quite like Bratin, Ramesh Gorjala takes inspiration from mythology but gives the paintings his own spin. The artist portrays Indian gods and goddesses using Kalamkari techniques, with rich gold, red and green colour lending vibrancy to his canvas. With exquisite attention to detail and intricate designs, his paintings imbibe a traditional and spiritual feel. Anjaneyulu G’s works give iconic status to mundane objects around us, making one sit up and take keen notice.

Curated by G. Vignesh, the exhibition is on till 20 December.

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT