An exchange of ideas

DECCAN CHRONICLE. | BANSARI TRIVEDI J
Published Sep 26, 2018, 12:07 am IST
Updated Sep 26, 2018, 12:07 am IST
The team for Hyderabad was hosted by Prof. Yuichiro Takahashi of Okayama University.
The Sakura Science Exchange Program proved to be a learning opportunity for a team from Hyderabad
 The Sakura Science Exchange Program proved to be a learning opportunity for a team from Hyderabad

A research group from the University of Hyderabad, embarked on an international adventure. The team headed by Professor Rajagopal Subramanyam of the Department of Plant Sciences had an enriching experience during the Sakura Science Exchange Program held in Japan. The other team members were Chinthapalli Dinesh Kumar (Postdoc), Nagati Veerababu (Postdoc) as well as PhD Scholars (students) Nerusu Aparna, Madireddi Sai Kiran, Nama Srilatha, Zamal Mohammad Yusuf Zamal, Chouhan Nisha, Yadav Ranay Mohan, Pandey Jayendra and Dhokane Kunal Babarao.

The programme aimed at raising the interest of Asian youth in Japanese science and technology by allowing them to explore Japan’s universities, research institutions and private companies. 

 

The team for Hyderabad was hosted by Prof. Yuichiro Takahashi of Okayama University. During the trip, they also had fruitful interactions with Prof. Yuichiro Takahashi, Prof. Ren Shen,  Prof. Wataru Sakamoto, Prof. Toshiharu Shikanai and Dr Ifuku. There were presentations of research work and exchange of scientific ideas between the groups. 

“It was a great opportunity for us. We got to visit different laboratories and learn many things through the exchange,” shares Dhokane Kunal Babarao, a member of the group. 

But it wasn’t all work and play for these scientists. During the trip, the acquainted themselves with Japanese culture and even got the chance to visit important tourist destinations like Hiroshima, Miyajimaguchi Island Shrine Temple and the National Museum of Art and Science, Japan. They were impressed with Japan’s multifaceted culture and felt it was a unique society. 

“We also learnt about the origin of Buddhism. Although there are records of Buddhist monks from China coming to Japan before the Asuka Period, the ‘official’ introduction of Buddhism to Japan is dated to 552 CE in Nihon Shoki,” says a team member.

When asked about their best memory, the team members unanimously agrees that the food was the highlight. Although the vegetarians had limited options, they too relished the traditional dishes. All in all, it was an eye-opening experience. 

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