Lifestyle Travel 03 Aug 2021 Lack of tourism circ ...

Lack of tourism circuit keeps monuments buried

DECCAN CHRONICLE.
Published Aug 3, 2021, 10:27 pm IST
Updated Aug 3, 2021, 10:27 pm IST
A proposal to form tourism circuits to connect interior historic places in Rayalaseema region has been neglected for the past decade
Historic Bugga Ramalingeswara Swamy temple and Chintala Venkataramana Swamy temple in Tadipatri have also failed to attract tourists and devotees. —  Representational image/DC
 Historic Bugga Ramalingeswara Swamy temple and Chintala Venkataramana Swamy temple in Tadipatri have also failed to attract tourists and devotees. — Representational image/DC

ANANTAPUR: Lack of minimum academic knowledge and insensitivity of historical-cultural heritage sites among the students and young generations lead to negligence of local historic sites in Anantapur district. History lovers and academicians are now demanding inclusion of heritage sites in curricula as part of the ongoing academic reforms.

The tourism department allegedly failed to create tourism circuits connecting the heritage sites and to empower a multicultural and inclusive student body to overcome the social, cultural, economic and geographic barriers in the state. Except for a few sites that are in the limelight, a large number of monuments have failed to attract even local institutions.

 

Forts, monuments, great sculptures, temples and exclusive locations could not be brought to light due to lack of proper transport connectivity and other facilities. Except during special occasions, the tourist spots have been dark throughout the year. The concept of

connectivity is to provide easy access to interior locations along with familiar spots. But no action has been initiated by the departments concerned.

A proposal to form tourism circuits to connect interior historic places in Rayalaseema region has been neglected and confined to papers for the past decade.

 

For instance, Hemavathi was once the capital of Pallavas during the 9th-10th centuries and a repository of a striking collection of Pallava and Chola architecture. It only has a Lord Shiva

temple appearing in human form in South India.

“Except during the annual fete on Shivarathri, the devotees and tourists face difficulty in reaching the temple because it is located in an interior area on Karnataka borders in Amarapuram mandal, dead end of the southwest of state. It was a university during

the 10th century,” K. Siddeswar, a devotee from Bengaluru observed.

 

Similarly, Ratnagiri, familiar as Seema Golconda in Rolla mandal, is in a state of neglect. The ruined historical fort gained historic importance during the Pandyan and Chola dynasties. Later, it fell into the hands of Hyder Ali. “It was badly neglected for decades,” historian Jayachandra lamented.

Historic Bugga Ramalingeswara Swamy temple and Chintala Venkataramana Swamy temple in Tadipatri have also failed to attract tourists and devotees.

Thimmamma Marrimanu, which entered the Guinness Book of World Records, is unable to attract more tourists due to poor access and its location in interior parts of Kadiri area. Belum Caves are ranked second largest after Meghalaya Caves and it is the longest cave

 

in India.

“Each is unique in its own way and every construction clearly depicts the richness of ancient art. There is an immediate need to connect all incredible landmarks in Rayalaseema and neighbouring Karnataka state. Next-generation will understand the value of the places,” Dr M. Suresh Babu, president of Praja Science Vedika demanded.

AP Central University plans to include these places of historical importance in the curriculum to highlight local issues during ongoing reforms in the education policy.

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