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Here's why you shouldn't offer your co-workers help unless asked

ANI
Published Oct 25, 2018, 1:44 pm IST
Updated Oct 25, 2018, 1:44 pm IST
Experts say proactive help has negative bearings on both sides - but for different reasons.
Here's why you shouldn't offer co-workers help unless asked. (Photo: Pixabay)
 Here's why you shouldn't offer co-workers help unless asked. (Photo: Pixabay)

Washington: If you think that proactively offering help to your co-workers is a good thing, think again. According to a new research when it comes to offering your expertise, it's better to keep it to yourself or wait until you're asked for help.

Building upon previous findings that showed how helping colleagues slows one's success, management professor Russell Johnson looked more closely at the different kinds of help in which people engage at work - and how that help was received.

 

The research findings were published in the Journal of Applied Psychology.

"Right now, there's a lot of stress on productivity in the workplace, and to be a real go-getter and help everyone around you. But, it's not necessarily the best thing when you go out looking for problems and spending time trying to fix them," said Johnson.

Johnson surveyed 54 employees between the ages of 21 and 60 who worked full-time jobs across a variety of industries, including manufacturing, government, healthcare, and education. He collected data over 10 days for a collective 232 daily observations to assess daily helping, receipt of gratitude, perceived positive social impact and work engagement.

With less gratitude for the helper and lower esteem for the person receiving help, Johnson explained that the respondents' answers proved that proactive help has negative bearings on both sides - but for different reasons.

In looking at the ways people help one another in the workplace, Johnson explained that there are two basic kinds of help one can offer - proactive and reactive help - which are differentiated by whether or not assistance was requested.

If you are the go-getter and actively offering to help others, you're proactively helping. If a co-worker approaches you and asks for assistance that you then give, you're reactively helping, Johnson explained.

"What we found was that on the helper side, when people engage in proactive help, they often don't have a clear understanding of recipients' problems and issues, thus they receive less gratitude for it. On the recipient side, if people are constantly coming up to me at work and asking if I want their help, it could have an impact on my esteem and become frustrating. I'm not going to feel inclined to thank the person who tried to help me because I didn't ask for it," added Johnson.

"Being proactive can have toxic effects, especially on the helper. They walk away receiving less gratitude from the person that they're helping, causing them to feel less motivated at work the next day. More often than not, help recipients won't express gratitude immediately, which makes it meaningless as it relates to the helper's actual act. As for the person receiving the unrequested help, they begin to question their own competency and feel a threat to their workplace autonomy," said Johnson.

In some ways, Johnson said that his research suggested workers mind their own business and not go looking for problems to solve.

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