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Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 23 Nov 2017 Risk of autism dange ...

Risk of autism dangerously high for couples who rush second pregnancy

DECCAN CHRONICLE
Published Nov 23, 2017, 2:38 pm IST
Updated Nov 23, 2017, 2:47 pm IST
Researcher recommend women wait at least 18 months before trying to have another baby.
Researchers warn autism risk high for women who conceive within 2 years of giving birth. (Photo: Pexels)
 Researchers warn autism risk high for women who conceive within 2 years of giving birth. (Photo: Pexels)

A new study warns couples rushing to get pregnant within two years of giving birth have a higher chance of having a child with autism.

US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states the risk is 50% higher, according to a report by the Daily Mail. However, waiting for too long like four years is just as risky, researchers warn as it can lead to fertility issues.

 

Women require close to 18 months to get to a healthy state so they have the level of nutrients to nourish a baby they are carrying. Researchers recommend sticking to this time frame to avoid low birth weight, placental abruption and premature births, the report stated.

For the study, researchers analysed the data from 356 children with autism, 600 with developmental disorders and 524 children with no disorders. Based on this information they discovered that if the "birth spacing" was too long or short it was "uniquely" connected with autism.

"These findings support existing guidelines on pregnancy spacing and further highlight the association between autism and pregnancy health," lead author Dr. Laura Schieve of CDC told the Daily Mail. Adding, "Couples thinking about getting pregnant should discuss pregnancy planning with a trusted doctor or healthcare provider."

The study was originally published in the journal Autism Research.

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