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Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 23 Apr 2018 Consumption of fish ...

Consumption of fish linked to better long-term neurological health

ANI
Published Apr 23, 2018, 4:45 pm IST
Updated Apr 23, 2018, 4:45 pm IST
Parvalbumin, a protein found in different fish species, helps prevent development of Parkinson's disease-related protein structures.
Parvalbumin, a protein found in different fish species, helps prevent development of Parkinson's disease-related protein structures. (Photo: Pixabay)
 Parvalbumin, a protein found in different fish species, helps prevent development of Parkinson's disease-related protein structures. (Photo: Pixabay)

Turns out, eating fish is a lot more than just taste or protein consumption.

A study conducted by the Chalmers University of Technology has explored the link between consumption of fish and better long-term neurological health.

 

Parvalbumin, a protein found in great quantities in several different fish species, has been shown to help prevent the formation of certain protein structures closely associated with Parkinson's disease.

Fish has long been considered a healthy food, linked to improved long-term cognitive health, but the reasons for this have been unclear. Omega-3 and -6, fatty acids commonly found in fish, are often assumed to be responsible and are commonly marketed in this fashion.

However, the scientific research regarding this topic has drawn mixed conclusions. Now, new research from Chalmers has shown that the protein parvalbumin, which is very common in many fish species, may be contributing to this effect.

One of the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease is an amyloid formation of a particular human protein, called alpha-synuclein. Alpha-synuclein is even sometimes referred to as the 'Parkinson's protein'.

What the Chalmers researchers have now discovered, is that parvalbumin can form amyloid structures that bind together with the alpha-synuclein protein.

Parvalbumin effectively 'scavenges' the alpha-synuclein proteins, using them for its own purposes, thus preventing them from forming their own potentially harmful amyloids later on.

"Parvalbumin collects up the 'Parkinson's protein' and actually prevents it from aggregating, simply by aggregating itself first," explained Pernilla Wittung-Stafshede, the lead author on the study.

With the parvalbumin protein so highly abundant in certain fish species, increasing the amount of fish in our diet might be a simple way to fight off Parkinson's disease.

Herring, cod, carp, and redfish, including sockeye salmon and red snapper, have particularly high levels of parvalbumin, but it is common in many other fish species too. The levels of parvalbumin can also vary greatly throughout the year.

"Fish is normally a lot more nutritious at the end of the summer, because of increased metabolic activity. Levels of parvalbumin are much higher in fish after they have had a lot of sun, so it could be worthwhile increasing consumption during autumn," said researcher Nathalie Scheers.

Wittung-Stafshede stressed the importance of finding ways to combat these neurological conditions in the future. "These diseases come with age, and people are living longer and longer. There's going to be an explosion of these diseases in the future - and the scary part is that we currently have no cures. So we need to follow up on anything that looks promising."

The study appears in the journal Scientific Reports. 

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