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Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 22 Dec 2018 Cure for Aids: Scien ...

Cure for Aids: Scientists destroy HIV-infected cells in major breakthrough

DECCAN CHRONICLE
Published Dec 22, 2018, 4:36 pm IST
Updated Dec 22, 2018, 4:36 pm IST
According to researchers they have successfully destroyed cells infected with virus, typically treated with antiretroviral drugs.
The study was funded by the Institut Pasteur, AmfAR (American Foundation for AIDS research) and Sidaction.  (Photo: AP)
 The study was funded by the Institut Pasteur, AmfAR (American Foundation for AIDS research) and Sidaction. (Photo: AP)

In a stunning revelation, scientists have announced a potentially major breakthrough in the fight against HIV.

According to eesearchers at Paris' Institut Pasteur, they have successfully destroyed cells infected with the virus, which is typically treated with antiretroviral drugs.

 

The drugs are unable to remove the virus from the body, but medical journal Cell Metabolism published findings which announced that scientists had found a way to eliminate infected 'reservoir' cells. 

In a release uploaded to EurekaAlert, an Institut Pasteur spokesperson said that the antiretroviral treatment used today is designed to block HIV infection but it is not able to eliminate the virus from the body.

He added, “The virus remains in reservoirs - the CD4 T lymphocyte immune cells, the main targets of HIV.”

Notably, HIV targets cells with high metabolic activity and 'hijacks' their energy in order to multiply.

The release goes on to state, “Thanks to metabolic activity inhibitors, the researchers have managed to destroy these infected cells, or "reservoirs", ex vivo.”

It concludes by stating that the research opens the possibility of new pathways towards remission by eliminating the 'reservoir' cells.

The next step in research will be assessing the potential of metabolic inhibitors 'in vivo' - tested on living organisms.

Theoretically, if the viral load is low enough, destroying the cell HIV hides in and draws energy from could keep it from spreading in the body and, perhaps, eradicate it altogether, it is hoped.  

The study was funded by the Institut Pasteur, AmfAR (American Foundation for AIDS research) and Sidaction.

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