133rd Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra45019628703015842 Tamil Nadu2632222022834241 Andhra Pradesh166586886781537 Karnataka139571625002594 Delhi1384821242544021 Uttar Pradesh97362553931778 West Bengal78232548181731 Telangana6766048609551 Gujarat64684476632504 Bihar5956738508336 Rajasthan4555532051719 Assam4527633429109 Haryana3717330470440 Odisha3629723074248 Madhya Pradesh3428524099900 Kerala268731527885 Jammu and Kashmir2200614032407 Punjab1852711882442 Jharkhand135004794125 Chhatisgarh9820725661 Uttarakhand7800453890 Goa6816487656 Tripura5389360527 Puducherry3982241156 Manipur292017667 Himachal Pradesh2818165813 Nagaland21296574 Arunachal Pradesh175810633 Chandigarh116070619 Meghalaya9022645 Sikkim6882971 Mizoram4962660
Lifestyle Health and Wellbeing 19 Nov 2018 Liver disease risk h ...

Liver disease risk high for infants born to obese mothers

ANI
Published Nov 19, 2018, 9:24 am IST
Updated Nov 19, 2018, 9:24 am IST
Obesity increases the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which impacts at least 30 percent of obese children.
Liver disease risk high for infants born to obese mothers.(Photo: Pixabay)
 Liver disease risk high for infants born to obese mothers.(Photo: Pixabay)

Washington DC: Infants born to obese mothers can develop liver disease and obesity, a recent study suggests.

Childhood obesity is a world-wide epidemic with recent predictions saying that 57 percent of today's children will be obese by age 35. That parallels the rate of maternal obesity which is nearly 40 percent. Obesity increases the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) which impacts at least 30 percent of obese children. NAFLD can lead to liver failure, requiring a transplant.

 

As part of the study, published in the journal of Nature Communications, researchers looked at two-week old infants born to normal weight mothers and obese mothers. They took stool samples from infants from both groups and colonized them inside germ-free mice.

They discovered that the gut microbes from babies born to obese mothers caused metabolic and inflammatory changes to the liver and bone marrow cells of the mice. Then, when fed a Western-style high fat diet, these mice were predisposed to more rapid weight gain and development of fattier livers.

 

"This is the first experimental evidence in support of the hypothesis that changes in the gut microbiome in infants born to obese mothers directly initiate these disease pathways," Taylor Soderborg, lead author the study said.

"If we could modify the first two weeks of the infant microbiome, we could reduce the risk of this disease," said Jed Friedman, the study's senior author.

...




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT